LOUIS CLIFFORD MANCILL HISTORY POST #15

IN AUGUST 1970,  JEAN AND I TOOK A TRIP, WITH HER CHILDREN AND NIECE, SALLY, AND KARL FREDERICK, AND REBECCA COOKE TO DUBUQUE, IOWA FOR AUNT GLADYS ( LINDERMAN) NELSON’S BIRTHDAY ON AUGUST 17TH. WHEN WE GOT TO AUNT GLADY’S DAD, HARRY LINDERMAN, (JEAN’S FATHER), WAS THERE. HE HAD FLOWN TO DUBUQUE AND HE BEAT US THERE. WE HAD A WONDERFUL TIME.

IN THE FALL OF THE YEAR WHEN THE LEAVES WERE TURNING TO DIFFERENT  COLORS AND FALLING AND BLOWING IN THE WIND. AS WE WERE DRIVING ALONG THE HIGHWAY AT 60 MPH, JEAN WOULD SAY “STOP THE CAR, STOP THE CAR, I SEE THAT ROCK I WANT” AND I WOULD STOP, TURN AROUND GO  BACK AND GET ROCK (IF I COULD LIFT IT) LOAD IT IN THE CAR AND BY THE TIME WE GOT HOME I WOULD HAVE A TRUNK FULL OF ROCK. 

ON ONE OF OUR TRIPS WE WENT TO COLORADO  AND WENT UP MT. EVANS THAT IS THE HIGHEST AUTO BOND THAT YOU CAN DRIVE A CAR UP AND ABOUT HALF WAY UP WE STOPPED TO LOOK AT THE SNOW AND JEAN SAW ONE THOSE ROCKS SHE WANTED AND SO I STARTED TO LOAD IT AND I ALMOST DID NOT GET IT IN THE CAR . IT WAS GRANITE AND THE AIR WAS SO THIN AND I WAS OUT OF BREATH BUT I DID LOAD IT UNDER HER FEET. WHEN WE STARTED DOWN THE ROAD WAS NARROW AND  JEAN WOULD NOT LOOK OUT HER WINDOW BECAUSE  IT WAS STRAIGHT DOWN AND SHE CAN NOT STAND HEIGHTS  SHE LAID DOWN ON TOP OF THE ROCK TILL WE GOT TO LEVEL GROUND. BUT I MADE GOOD USE OF THEM.  I NOW HAVE A BEAUTIFUL FOUNTAIN IN THE BACK YARD WITH A ROCK FROM ALMOST EVERY STATE. IT IS NICE TO SIT AND LISTEN TO THE WATER FALLING OVER THE ROCKS.

Guadalupe River

Every year we took a trip during the summer to the Guadalupe River, New Braunfels, Texas.

WHEN I BUILT THE FOUNTAIN THE BIG ROOM WAS NOT ADDED TO THE BACK OF THE  HOUSE AND IN 1976 WHEN I GOT THE ROOM BUILT, A 16 BY 16 FT, THEN THE FOUNTAIN WAS ONLY 18 INCHES FROM THE ROOM. IT WAS SOME TIME LATER THAT JEAN SAID  ” I WISH THE FOUNTAIN WAS MOVED OUT IN THE YARD AWAY FROM THE HOUSE”  I MADE THE MISTAKE OF SAYING IT COULD BE MOVED. SHE TOOK ME UP ON IT WAS NOT LONG BEFORE  MIKE AND I STARTED ON IT. I WAS LUCKY THE ROCKS WERE NOT CEMENTED TO THE BASIN. THE BASIN WAS 6 FT ON THE FRONT 7 FT ON THE BACK AND 8 FT ON THE SIDES WITH “12 BY 6” WALLS AND “4“ BOTTOM AND IT WOULD WEIGH ABOUT 4,000 LBS. WITH AN A-FRAME AND A CHAIN-FALL AND COME-ALONGS FROM THE SHOP WHERE I WORKED AND PIPES, TIMBERS AND BOARDS AND MOST OF ALL WITH MIKE’S HELP WE MOVED IT TO WHERE IT IS NOW. THEN I BUILT THE SIDES AND BACK  UP LIKE IT IS NOW AND CEMENTED THE ROCKS AND PUT THE PIPES IN FOR THE WATER FALL. IT MUST NOW WEIGH 10,000 LBS. JEAN SAID SHE WANTED A JUNGLE IN THE YARD AND THAT’S WHAT SHE HAS NOW. IT WAS WORK BUT I ENJOYED DOING IT.

Our beautiful fountain built by Lou

 DEC. /15 / 2OO1. (Tropical Storm Allison hit our home and flooded it July 2001 with 3-1/2 foot of water in it. Everything had to be ripped out and remodeled. We had no flood insurance. We had never flooded, and probably will never again. I think my Dad worked so hard on helping to remodel our home that it helped to make him weaker and his heart just finally gave out.)

I HAVE NOT BEEN WRITING ON THIS STORY FOR SOME TIME NOW FOR I GOT BUSY ON OTHER THINGS  AND TIME GOES ON AND GETS AWAY FROM YOU QUICK.  IT HAS BEEN ABOUT THREE YEARS NOW  AND I WANT TRY TO GET BACK TO WRITING THIS AGAIN.

I WILL START WRITING ABOUT THE TRIPS WE HAVE BEEN ON.

(My Dad passed away on 20 December 2002 at home with his family surrounding him. He had Congestive Heart Failure, so did his son Carl Louis Mancill. His mother also had heart problems. He had fought the good fight for years. He and mother married on 5 December 1968 at the Harmony Wedding Chapel, Houston, Texas. The doctors had given him at the most six more months to live on 19 December 2002, so we had hospice come out for him. We did not expect him to leave us so soon, but he left us at 6:31am that next morning.)

WHAT DO YOU SAY ABOUT A MAN WHO WAS SUCH A LOVING EXAMPLE OF CHRIST’S LOVE? 

THANK YOU…

I LOVE YOU…

I THANK GOD EVERYDAY THAT YOU WERE A PART OF OUR LIVES. I KNOW THAT I WAS BLESSED THROUGH HIS LIFE, AND HE PASSED WITH HIS LOVING WIFE, JEAN MANCILL; AND HIS CHILDREN BESIDE HIM.  PHYLLIS HYDEN, MIKE MANCILL, SALLY BROWN, AND SARAH MOORE, STAYED ALL NIGHT WITH HIM. WE TALKED MOTHER INTO LAYING DOWN TO REST, THEN ME AND SARAH FELL ASLEEP ABOUT 4 am. PHYLLIS AND MIKE STAYED WITH HIM ALL NIGHT, TRYING TO COMFORT HIM AS HE PASSED ON TO MEET JESUS. I NEVER DREAMED THAT JESUS WOULD TAKE HIM SO SOON. THE DOCTORS THE NIGHT BEFORE AT THE HOSPITAL, HAD TOLD US THAT HE MIGHT HAVE 6 MONTHS LEFT. WE DIDN’T REALLY BELIEVE THAT HE WOULD LEAVE US SO SOON, BUT I KNOW THAT IS WHAT HE WANTED–TO DIE WITH DIGNITY–IN HIS OWN HOME SURROUNDED BY THE PEOPLE WHO LOVED HIM. LOU HAS BEEN GONE ALMOST 2 YEARS NOW, AND IT STILL MAKES ME CRY TO WRITE THIS. YET, I AM SO GRATEFUL THAT I HAVE MY MOTHER STILL HERE TO BE WITH US.

(Mother passed away on March 9, 2012 from Kidney Failure due to her Diabetes. She had to live ten years without Lou. My husband, Leonard Tudor, and I lived with her for about six years, from April 2006 until March 2012 and took care of her until she passed away. I inherited our home from mother when she passed.) 

LOU OR AS THE GRANDCHILDREN CALL HIM, “HONEY” HAS BEEN LIKE A FATHER TO ME AND MY SISTERS AND BROTHERS. HE HAS BEEN NOT ONLY GOOD TO MY MOTHER, BUT ALSO TO ALL OF HIS STEP-CHILDREN.

THE MOST SPECIAL THING “LOU” EVER TOLD ME WAS WHEN I WAS ABOUT SIXTEEN YEARS OF AGE.  I WAS WORRYING ABOUT MY LOOKS AS USUAL. I WAS GETTING READY FOR A DATE, AND I COULDN’T MAKE UP MY MIND WHETHER I WAS GOING TO WEAR ANY MAKE-UP OR NOT. LOU TOLD ME THAT I WAS SO BEAUTIFUL THAT I DIDN’T NEED TO WEAR ANY MAKE-UP, AND THAT I LOOKED BEAUTIFUL WITHOUT IT. HE PROBABLY NEVER KNEW JUST HOW MUCH THAT ONE SENTENCE MEANT TO ME. I HAD NEVER HAD ANY MAN, OR BOY TELL ME THAT I WAS BEAUTIFUL!  I LOVE YOU LOU AND YOU ARE SPECIAL!   LOVE, SALLY MARCH 19, 1995.

LOUIS AND HIS FAMILY MOVED TO MOBILE, ALABAMA IN 1943.  HE WENT TO WORK FOR THE SOUTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD IN 1950’S, IN HOUSTON, TEXAS. HE SERVED IN THE U.S. ARMY IN WORLD WAR II HIS TROOP MARCHED ALONG THE AUSTRIAN GERMAN BORDER TO FRANCE.  HE ALSO SERVED IN THE U.S. ARMY IN THE KOREAN WAR IN SEOUL, KOREA.

LOUIS CLIFFORD MANCILL WAS RAISED ON A FARM BETWEEN ROBERTSDALE & SUMMERSDALE, ALABAMA UNTIL ABOUT 1943 WHEN THE MANCILL FAMILY MOVED TO MOBILE, ALABAMA. LOUIS WROTE HIS MEMOIRS. I PRINTED A COPY OF THEM AND GAVE THEM TO MY STEP BROTHER, MIKE MANCILL, UPON MY DAD’S PASSING. I HOPE THAT HE SHARES IT WITH HIS DESCENDANTS ALSO. MY DAD ASKED ME MORE THAN ONCE, WHY I DO ALL THIS WORK ON OUR GENEALOGY, THAT NO ONE WOULD EVER READ IT.

SO SAD, THAT HE THOUGHT NO ONE WOULD CARE TO READ HIS HISTORY, BUT HE WAS A HUMBLE MAN. I TOLD HIM THAT I WOULD READ IT, AND THERE WOULD BE “SOMEONE” OUT THERE WHO WILL WANT TO KNOW. BESIDES THAT, I TOLD HIM, I ENJOY LEARNING ABOUT OUR FAMILY HISTORY. LOU LEFT OFF ON HIS HISTORY IN THE 1970’S, WHEN WE TOOK A TRIP TO IOWA TO VISIT THE LINDERMAN HOME PLACE WITH US AND MOTHER. HE HAD TOO MUCH TROUBLE BREATHING IN THE LAST FEW YEARS TO FINISH. 

LOUIS’ FATHER, ELLIOTT MANCILL, WROTE A BOOK ABOUT HIS LIFE, WITH HIS BROTHER, GLENN MANCILL AND GRANDDAUGHTER, DEBORAH MANCILL HENDRIX, EDITING AND PRINTING IT. WE RECEIVED A COPY OF IT.

LOUIS CLIFFORD MANCILL HISTORY POST #14

JEAN (LINDERMAN) FREDERICK, AND I FOUND OURSELVES TOGETHER MORE AND MORE. ON DEC.5, 1968 WE WERE MARRIED AND OUR FRIENDSHIP BECAME STRONG AND WE FOUND WE LOVED EACH OTHER. TO ME IT WAS LIKE SOMETHING I ALWAYS THOUGHT IT SHOULD BE BUT IT NEVER WAS COMPLETE. WE WERE HAPPY TOGETHER AND LIFE HAS BEEN GOOD TO US. JEAN HELPED ME DO THINGS I NEVER THOUGHT I COULD DO. WE TOOK LOTS OF TRIPS TO PLACES I NEVER THOUGHT I WOULD SEE.

Louis & Jean Mancill, 1970, Pat O'Briens, New Orleans, LA

AFTER WE WERE MARRIED WE MOVED IN WITH JEAN’S SISTER, YVONNE (LINDERMAN) LEVESQUE. I STILL WORKED AT THE RAILROAD AND AT NORTHSHORE A/C. WE WENT TO MOBILE, ALABAMA TO MY MOTHER’S HOUSE ON A WEEK END TO SEE EVERYONE. WHAT A GOOD FEELING IT WAS TO BE ABLE TO BE AROUND THEM. THEY LIKED JEAN AND WE  FELT LIKE WE WERE HOME. WE WENT TO MOBILE OFTEN. THE HOUSE WAS CLOSE TO THE BAY AND WE ENJOYED SITTING ON THE WHARF AND WATCHING THE WATER.

IN 1969, THE NEXT YEAR, I QUIT THE RAILROAD AND WAS WORKING FULL TIME AT NORTHSHORE A/C RUNNING SERVICE AND PUTTING IN A/C AND HEAT IN SCHOOLS. IN JUNE 1969, I WAS WORKING ON AN A/C UNIT,ON THE ROOF AT NORTHLINE SHOPPING CENTER, WHEN I CAME UP THE LADDER WITH FREON IN ONE HAND AND CATCHING THE LADDER BAR WITH THE OTHER MY HAND SLIPPED OFF THE BAR, I FELL 30 FEET FROM A ROOF HATCH AND  BROKE MY LEFT ARM AND CRUSHED MY LEFT HEAL AND FOOT. I WAS IN A WHEELCHAIR FOR OVER TWO MONTHS AND OFF WORK. WE HAD JUST MADE A CONTRACT ON A NEW HOME IN HOUSTON,  TEXAS, WERE WE NOW LIVE. IT WAS NOT FINISHED AND THE CONTRACTOR SAID HE WOULD DELAY THE BUILDING OF IT UNTIL I WENT BACK TO WORK AND HE DID.

ONE OF THE TRIPS I REMEMBER WELL IS WHEN HURRICANE CAMILLE HIT THE GULF COAST IN AUGUST 1969 AND IT WRECKED  MOTHER AND DADDY’S HOUSE ON MOBILE BAY, MOBILE, ALABAMA BEYOND REPAIR. F.E.M.A GAVE DADDY A NEW TRAILER HOME AND DADDY PUT IT OUT ON THE HILL AWAY FROM THE BAY. THE CHURCH OF CHRIST IN GALENA PARK PUT TOGETHER A TRAILER LOAD OF CLOTHES AND ASKED IF I COULD TAKE IT TO MOBILE WHILE I WAS OFF AND I DID.  I COULD STILL DRIVE AND JEAN HELPED ME WITH THE WHEELCHAIR. WE HAD TO BYPASS THE COAST ON THE WAY TO MOBILE BUT CAME BACK ON THE COAST ROAD AND SAW ALL THE DEVASTATION OF EVERYTHING ALONG THE GULF COAST.

File:Camille1969Hwy90Damage.gif

I THINK, WE WENT THERE SIX TIMES IN THE FIRST YEAR. THERE IS NOTHING LIKE GOING ON A TRIP WHEN THERE IS SOME ONE WITH YOU THAT ENJOYS THINGS LIKE YOU DO. “AS THIS DOCUMENT WILL SHOW AS I WRITE ABOUT THE MANY TRIPS WE TOOK TOGETHER. (my Dad passed away in 2002 before he had the chance to write about their many trips).

WE BOTH TRIED TO KEEP OUR CHILDREN CLOSE TO US AND SHOW THEM WE LOVED THEM AS MUCH AS EVER. I NEVER TRIED TO TAKE THE PLACE OF THEIR FATHER IN ANY WAY, I JUST WANTED THEM TO KNOW I LOVED THEM AND WOULD BE THERE ANY TIME THEY NEEDED ME AND TO HELP IF I COULD.

I SOON WAS ABLE TO GO BACK TO WORK AND THE CONTRACTOR FINISHED THE HOUSE AND WE MOVED IN, ALTHOUGH I WAS ON CRUTCHES WITH A FOOT BRACE ON MY LEFT FOOT. WE DID NOT HAVE MUCH TO START WITH BUT WE HAD EACH OTHER. I REMEMBER BUILDING A FIRE IN THE FIREPLACE AND RUNNING THE A/C AT THE SAME TIME JUST TO SEE IF IT WORKED OK. IT DID NOT TAKE LONG TO PUT MORE THINGS IN THE HOUSE. WE ENJOYED OUR NEW HOME. OUR FRIENDS AND LOVED ONES GAVE US A LOT OF THINGS TO HELP US TO FURNISH THE INSIDE AND WE THANKED THEM FOR IT.

RIGHT AFTER WE WERE MARRIED, WE BOUGHT A LOT, ON THE LAKE, IN SAM HOUSTON LAKE ESTATES, NEAR CLEVELAND, TEXAS. WE PITCHED I SMALL TENT ON IT AND WENT THERE ON WEEK ENDS. THE FISHING WAS GOOD AND WE BUILT BONFIRES AND COOKED WIENERS AND MARSHMALLOWS AND HAD GOOD TIMES THERE. THE TENT DID NOT LAST LONG BECAUSE IT WAS LATE DECEMBER AND ONE NIGHT WE GOT THERE AFTER IT HAD RAINED AND IT TURN COLD. WE WERE IN SLEEPING BAGS, ON COTS, BUT THE GROUND WAS WET AND WE WERE ALMOST FROZEN BY MORNING. THE NEXT WEEK END WE STARTED THE FLOOR FOR A 16 BY 16 FOOT, ONE ROOM CABIN TO STAY IN AND KEEP WARM WHEN WE WERE THERE. WE SOON HAD THE LUXURIES OF HOME. AN OUTDOOR PRIVY (outhouse) , AND A DOUBLE SINK IN THE YARD,MOUNTED ON A TREE WITH RUNNING WATER TO IT AND IN THE SUMMER  WE COULD TAKE A BATH AT NIGHT IN IT FOR ONE SIDE WAS DEEP ENOUGH TO SIT IN. 

Cleveland, Texas

AFTER WE GOT THE  ROOM BUILT WE MOVED THE SINK INSIDE AND MOUNTED IT ON A 2 BY 4 FRAME AND RUN COOL WATER TO IT. WE HAD NO HOT WATER HEATER YET. WE HEATED WATER ON THE STOVE.  JEAN’S FATHER GAVE US A REFRIGERATOR THAT WOULD SQUEAL EVERY TIME IT CUT OFF BUT WOULD MAKE ICE AND KEEP THINGS COLD. WE USED IT TILL WE WERE FLOODED OUT IN 1988 AND WATER GOT TO IT. WE HAD SOME OLD MATTRESSES GIVEN TO US, THAT WE WOULD SLEEP ON AND PILE THEM UP IN THE MORNING. ONE NIGHT WE HAD ELEVEN CHILDREN SLEEPING WITH US IN THIS ROOM. WE ENJOYED THE GROUPS TO COME SHARE WHAT WE HAD. NOT LONG AFTER THAT I ADDED A PORCH TO THE SIDE NEXT TO THE LAKE THAT WAS 12 BY 16 AND SCREENED ON 3 SIDES WITH A FLAT ROOF.

IN 1976 WE ADDED TO THE ROOM A 14 BY 28 STORY AND A HALF WITH ONE BIG ROOM UP STAIRS AND TWO ROOMS DOWNSTAIRS,ONE 18 BY 14 AND THE OTHER ONE 10 BY 14 FEET. THE PRIVY WAS STILL OUTSIDE. BUT I SOON BUILT A BATH ROOM  IN THE CORNER OF THE TWO BUILDINGS,WITH THE DOOR INTO THE LIVING ROOM,WITH FULL BATH AND SHOWER,COMMODE AND WASHBASIN ALSO A HOT WATER HEATER. NOW WE HAVE A PLACE AWAY FROM HOME, WITH TV, PHONE AND CARPET, WITH EVERYTHING TO ENJOY WITH A PLACE FOR EVERYONE TO COME AND BE WITH US WHEN THEY WANT TO. WE DID A LOT OF FISHING AND CAUGHT SOME GOOD BASS AND WHITE PERCH AND HAD SOME GOOD FISH FRYS. WE WOULD BUILD BON FIRES AT NIGHT  AND ROAST WIENERS AND MARSHMALLOWS WE PLAYED GAMES AND SANG SONGS.

THE FIRST PART OF MAY 1970 I WAS WORKING AS SUPERINTENDENT ON FONDREN SCHOOL. ONE OF THE MEN WORKING WITH ME ON THE JOB, WAS BILL KINDRED’S BROTHER AND ONE WAS HIS SON. THEY DID NOT WANT TO WORK, JUST PLAY. WHAT THEY DID WORK ON WAS NOT DONE RIGHT AND HAD TO BE DONE OVER. I SENT WORD BACK TO THE SHOP AND THE NEXT WEEK, I WAS FIRED BECAUSE I COULD NOT GET THE JOB DONE.  THE MEN SAID THAT THEY WORKED HARD AND DID NOT PLAY ON THE JOB. I WAS FIRED ANYWAY.

THAT WAS ON THURSDAY NIGHT. ONE OF THE SALESMAN IN THE OFFICE SAID HE KNEW WHERE I COULD GET A JOB. HE CALLED MR.THOMPSON AT THE LEE THOMPSON CO. I WENT TO THE OFFICE FRIDAY MORNING AND TALKED TO MR. THOMPSON. THAT AFTERNOON HE PUT ME TO WORK. MONDAY MORNING I HAD A NEW TRUCK WITH EVERYTHING I NEEDED EXCEPT TOOLS, AND I HAD MY OWN TOOLS. WHAT A DIFFERENCE A MAN MAKES, TO WORK FOR SOMEONE LIKE MR.THOMPSON WAS, IT WAS A PRIVILEGE AND AN HONOR. HE WAS LIKE A SECOND FATHER. HE TREATED THE MEN WHO WORKED FOR HIM LIKE WE WERE PART OF HIS FAMILY. HE ALWAYS SAID”THANK YOU”,OR “A JOB WELL DONE” WHEN WE COMPLETED A JOB. HE GAVE COMPANY PARTIES FOR THE MEN AND THEIR WIVES AT HIS HOME OR OTHER PLACES. THE OTHER MEN WERE GOOD TO WORK WITH TOO. I ENJOYED MY TWENTY YEARS WITH THE COMPANY AND BECAME ONE OF THE TOP SERVICEMEN IN THE COMPANY. IF SOMEONE HAD TROUBLE ON A JOB AND COULDN’T FIX IT THEY WOULD CALL ME TO GO FIND THE TROUBLE AND FIX IT. I RETIRED FROM THERE AFTER 20 YEARS OF SERVICE IN JANUARY 1990. I HAD GOTTEN OUT OF BED AND STEPPED ON MY RIGHT FOOT WRONG AND BROKE THE BONE TO MY LITTLE TOE UP IN THE FOOT AND HAD IT IN A CAST FOR THREE WEEKS SO THE BOSS SAID I SHOULD RETIRE SO I DID.

I RETIRED BUT I NEVER QUIT WORK THERE HAS BEEN SOMETHING TO DO OR WORK ON EVER SINCE, FOR I ALWAYS FIND THINGS THAT NEEDS FIXING I WAS 65 YEARS OLD NOVEMBER 2 1990. THE ONE THING I ENJOYED ABOUT THE JOB  MOST WAS , I WAS ALWAYS ON THE GO FROM ONE PLACE TO ANOTHER AND NOT IN ONE SHOP ALL THE TIME  I MET A LOT OF PEOPLE AND MADE A LOT OF FRIENDS. AFTER I RETIRED THE COMPANY CALLED ME BACK FROM TIME TO TIME TO HELP SOME ONE OUT ON A JOB HE WAS HAVING TROUBLE ON AND COULD NOT FIND THE TROUBLE WITH IT. I ALSO WORKED FOR RICHARD FALLIN ON HOUSES DOING A/C , ELECTRICAL,CARPENTER, AND PLUMBING REPAIR.  HE HAD ABOUT 100 HOUSES . HE GETS THEM WHEN THEY ARE IN BAD NEED OF REPAIR AND FIXES THEM UP TO RENT OR FOR RESALE.

LOUIS CLIFFORD MANCILL HISTORY POST #12

I JOINED THE ALABAMA NATIONAL GUARD AT FOLEY, ALABAMA IN 1949 WHILE I WORKED FOR CARLES SUBBLE. THERE WERE A GROUP OF BOYS I KNEW THAT WERE IN IT AND WE HAD SOME GOOD TIMES TOGETHER ON FIELD TRIPS. THE ARMY GAVE ME MY RANK OF BUCK SERGEANT BACK AND ADDED THE YEARS BETWEEN MY LAST TIME IN THE ARMY AT FORT HOOD TO MY RETIREMENT IF I STAYED IN FOR TWENTY YEARS. 

Alabama Army National Guard Eelement,Joint For...

Pacific Rail Society Special from LA to Reno s...
Pacific Rail Society Special from LA to Reno seen at Floriston, CA Feb 1971 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I WORKED AT THE KENNEDY FARM THROUGH 1949 AND GLENN HAD GONE TO HOUSTON AND GOT A JOB WITH THE SOUTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD AS A CAR CHECKER. HE ASKED HIS BOSS IF THEY WOULD GIVE HIS BROTHER A JOB. HE SAID YES SO IN MARCH 1950 I WENT TO HOUSTON AND GOT THE JOB AS A SWITCHMAN. I WAS STAYING WITH GLENN AND MARIE IN AN APARTMENT OFF WASHINGTON AVE. GLENN WENT TO MOBILE AND RODE MY MOTORCYCLE BACK AND IT HELPED TO HAVE IT TO GET AROUND ON AND NOT HAVE TO RIDE THE BUS. I WORKED AWHILE AND SENT FOR MYRTLE TO COME TO HOUSTON AND  SHE DID AND WE GOT AN APARTMENT ON AVE. H JUST OFF WAYSIDE FOR A MONTH AND THEN I BOUGHT THE HOUSE ON CHESTON DR. THROUGH A VETERANS LOAN. I PAID ONE DOLLAR FOR CLOSING COST TO MOVE IN AND FORTY NINE DOLLARS A MONTH. I WONDERED HOW I COULD MAKE THE NOTES. I WAS MAKING $14.OO A DAY. GLENN AND MARIE MOVED IN WITH US AND WE STILL HAD ROOM ENOUGH FOR ALL.

GLENN AND I WORKED IN THE SAME RAIL YARD AND WE RODE THE MOTORCYCLE TO WORK. ONE DAY WE WERE WORKING AND I GOT OFF BEFORE HE DID AND I WENT TO GET THE MOTORCYCLE AND IT WAS GONE. SOME ONE HAD STOLEN IT. WE NEVER FOUND IT.

IN 1950, THE WAR IN KOREA STARTED AND THE ALABAMA NATIONAL GUARD WAS CALLED UP FOR SERVICE, AND I HAD TO GO BACK TO FOLEY TO JOIN THEM. THE RAILROAD PUT MY JOB ON HOLD TILL I CAME BACK, AND GLENN STAYED IN THE HOUSE AND PAID THE NOTES.

WHILE WE WAITED FOR EVERY ONE TO REPORT WE DID DRILLS AND MARCHED AROUND FOLEY. WE WERE DOING HAND TO HAND COMBAT WITH EACH OTHER AND WHEN I PICKED UP THE MAN I WAS WITH TO THROW HIM. I SPUN AROUND ON MY RIGHT LEG AND MY KNEE JOINT CAME OUT OF SOCKET. THEY TOOK ME TO A DOCTOR AT FOLEY AND HE PUT IT BACK IN AND PUT MY LEG IN A CAST. I WENT TO SOUTH CAROLINA THAT WAY AND IT STILL BOTHERS ME.

I HAVE LARGE PICTURE OF THE TROOPS TRAIN IN FOLEY WHEN WE WERE LEAVING TO GO THE CAMP. DADDY, MOTHER, AND MYRTLE WITH CARL OUTSIDE THE TRAIN AND I WAS HANGING OUT THE WINDOW. IT WAS A SAD DAY FOR ALL OF US FOR ME TO BE LEAVING AGAIN FOR WAR. MY MOTHER TOOK IT THE HARDEST OF ALL.

I JOINED THE ALABAMA NATIONAL GUARD AT FOLEY, ALABAMA IN 1949 WHILE I WORKED FOR CARLES SUBBLE. THERE WERE A GROUP OF BOYS I KNEW THAT WERE IN IT AND WE HAD SOME GOOD TIMES TOGETHER ON FIELD TRIPS. THE ARMY GAVE ME MY RANK OF BUCK SERGEANT BACK AND ADDED THE YEARS BETWEEN MY LAST TIME IN THE ARMY AT FORT HOOD TO MY RETIREMENT IF I STAYED IN FOR TWENTY YEARS. I WORKED AT THE KENNEDY FARM THROUGH 1949 AND GLENN HAD GONE TO HOUSTON AND GOT A JOB WITH THE SOUTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD AS A CAR CHECKER. HE ASKED HIS BOSS IF THEY WOULD GIVE HIS BROTHER A JOB. HE SAID YES SO IN MARCH 1950 I WENT TO HOUSTON AND GOT THE JOB AS A SWITCHMAN. I WAS STAYING WITH GLENN AND MARIE IN AN APARTMENT OFF WASHINGTON AVE. GLENN WENT TO MOBILE AND RODE MY MOTORCYCLE BACK AND IT HELPED TO HAVE IT TO GET AROUND ON AND NOT HAVE TO RIDE THE BUS. I WORKED AWHILE AND SENT FOR MYRTLE TO COME TO HOUSTON AND  SHE DID AND WE GOT AN APARTMENT ON AVE. H JUST OFF WAYSIDE FOR A MONTH AND THEN I BOUGHT THE HOUSE ON CHESTON DR. THROUGH A VETERANS LOAN. I PAID ONE DOLLAR FOR CLOSING COST TO MOVE IN AND FORTY NINE DOLLARS A MONTH. I WONDERED HOW I COULD MAKE THE NOTES. I WAS MAKING $14.OO A DAY. GLENN AND MARIE MOVED IN WITH US AND WE STILL HAD ROOM ENOUGH FOR ALL.   GLENN AND I WORKED IN THE SAME RAIL YARD AND WE RODE THE MOTORCYCLE TO WORK. ONE DAY WE WERE WORKING AND I GOT OFF BEFORE HE DID AND I WENT TO GET THE MOTORCYCLE AND IT WAS GONE. SOME ONE HAD STOLEN IT. WE NEVER FOUND IT. IN 1950, THE WAR IN KOREA STARTED AND THE ALABAMA NATIONAL GUARD WAS CALLED UP FOR SERVICE, AND I HAD TO GO BACK TO FOLEY TO JOIN THEM. THE RAILROAD PUT MY JOB ON HOLD TILL I CAME BACK, AND GLENN STAYED IN THE HOUSE AND PAID THE NOTES. WHILE WE WAITED FOR EVERY ONE TO REPORT WE DID DRILLS AND MARCHED AROUND FOLEY. WE WERE DOING HAND TO HAND COMBAT WITH EACH OTHER AND WHEN I PICKED UP THE MAN I WAS WITH TO THROW HIM. I SPUN AROUND ON MY RIGHT LEG AND MY KNEE JOINT CAME OUT OF SOCKET. THEY TOOK ME TO A DOCTOR AT FOLEY AND HE PUT IT BACK IN AND PUT MY LEG IN A CAST. I WENT TO SOUTH CAROLINA THAT WAY AND IT STILL BOTHERS ME. I HAVE LARGE PICTURE OF THE TROOPS TRAIN IN FOLEY WHEN WE WERE LEAVING TO GO THE CAMP. DADDY, MOTHER, AND MYRTLE WITH CARL OUTSIDE THE TRAIN AND I WAS HANGING OUT THE WINDOW. IT WAS A SAD DAY FOR ALL OF US FOR ME TO BE LEAVING AGAIN FOR WAR. MY MOTHER TOOK IT THE HARDEST OF ALL.   I WAS THE COOK MESS SERGEANT FOR THE COMPANY AND I DID SOME COOKING BUT MY MAIN JOB WAS TO SEE THAT THINGS WERE DONE RIGHT AND MAKE OUT THE MENU FOR EACH MEAL AND MAKE SURE THE KITCHEN WAS KEPT CLEAN AT ALL TIMES. WHILE I WAS THERE MYRTLE CAME AND WE HAD AN APARTMENT IN TOWN. SHE STAYED ABOUT A MONTH BUT WE RAN OUT OF MONEY, THE THING ALL SERVICE MEN NEVER HAD ENOUGH OF UNLESS YOU LIVED ON THE BASE. I HAD AN OLD CAR AND I TOOK HER BACK HOME TO MOBILE TO HER MOTHER. IN 1951, ROBERT WAS BORN IN FEB. IN THE BROOKLEY FIELD HOSPITAL AND I GOT A WEEK END PASS AND WENT HOME TO SEE HIM. ON THE WAY BACK THE OLD CAR BROKE DOWN ABOUT SEVENTY MILES FROM THE BASE AND I HAD TO LEAVE IT AT A STATION TO HAVE IT FIXED AND CATCH A BUS ON TO THE BASE. I WAS LATE GETTING BACK ON TIME WAS IN TROUBLE AND WAS RESTRICTED FOR TWO WEEKS TO THE BARRACKS. I HAD MY GUITAR AND ALMOST EVERY NIGHT WE GOT A GROUP TOGETHER AND PLAYED FOR HOURS AND HOURS. I HAD CARRIED IT THROUGH GERMANY WHEN I WAS OVER THERE. SOMEONE WOULD ASK ME TO PLAY FOR THEM AND THEY DIDN'T HAVE TO TWIST MY ARM MUCH FOR I LIKED TO PLAY AND I KNEW A LOT OF SONGS. WHEN I STARTED TO PLAY SOMEONE ELSE WOULD GO GET THEIRS AND SOON WE WOULD HAVE A BAND GOING. I HAD FUN PLAYING. I WENT BACK AND GOT THE CAR AFTER IT WAS REPAIRED AND DROVE IT BACK TO THE BASE SOME WEEKS LATER AND USED IT AROUND THE BASE AND TO GO HOME ON A WEEK END PASS. THE COMPANY COMPLETED BASIC TRAINING ABOUT MARCH OR APRIL OF 1952 AND GROUPS OF FIFTEEN OR TWENTY MEN AT A TIME WERE SHIPPED OUT TO KOREA. I WAS SHIPPED WITH THE FIRST GROUP. WE WENT HOME ON A TEN DAY LEAVE IN ROUTE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND ON TO KOREA. WE WERE AT SEA FOR FOURTEEN DAYS BEFORE WE DOCKED AT SOUL KOREA. WE HAD TO ANCHOR OFF SHORE AND UNLOAD INTO SMALLER BOATS TO GET TO LAND BECAUSE THE TIDE WENT UP AND DOWN FIFTEEN FEET AND WOULD LEAVE THE SHIP ON THE BOTTOM AT LOW TIDE IF THE WATER WASN'T DEEP ENOUGH. BILL HAD JOINED THE AIR FORCE IN 1948 AND WAS IN IT WHEN THE WAR STARTED WITH KOREA. HE WAS STATIONED AT SEOUL WHEN I GOT THERE AND HE MET ME THERE. WE RODE UP TO MY OUTFIT [WHERE I WOULD BE STATIONED] ON A TRUCK TOGETHER. I WAS ASSIGNED TO THE HEADQUARTERS COMPANY OF THE THIRD ARMY DIVISION AS MESS SERGEANT.

My Dad, Louis C. Mancill moving out with the troops to Korea in 1950. His Father & Mother, Elliott D. Mancill & Cora Lee (Wilson) Mancill, his wife, Myrtle (Elder) Mancill, and son, Carl Mancill, were there to see him off, from Foley, Alabama. He entered the U.S. ARMY as a Private in World War II, and he also fought in the Korean War and was advanced to Buck Sergeant. He was one of the cooks on the front lines feeding our troops. He told me that sometimes he had to move the mess hall three or four times a day with the fighting. He played the guitar by ear and sung for his buddies. He was a proud World War II and Korean War veteran.

I WAS THE COOK MESS SERGEANT FOR THE COMPANY AND I DID SOME COOKING BUT MY MAIN JOB WAS TO SEE THAT THINGS WERE DONE RIGHT AND MAKE OUT THE MENU FOR EACH MEAL AND MAKE SURE THE KITCHEN WAS KEPT CLEAN AT ALL TIMES. WHILE I WAS THERE MYRTLE CAME AND WE HAD AN APARTMENT IN TOWN. SHE STAYED ABOUT A MONTH BUT WE RAN OUT OF MONEY, THE THING ALL SERVICE MEN NEVER HAD ENOUGH OF UNLESS YOU LIVED ON THE BASE. I HAD AN OLD CAR AND I TOOK HER BACK HOME TO MOBILE TO HER MOTHER.

IN 1951, ROBERT WAS BORN IN FEB. IN THE BROOKLEY FIELD HOSPITAL AND I GOT A WEEK END PASS AND WENT HOME TO SEE HIM. ON THE WAY BACK THE OLD CAR BROKE DOWN ABOUT SEVENTY MILES FROM THE BASE AND I HAD TO LEAVE IT AT A STATION TO HAVE IT FIXED AND CATCH A BUS ON TO THE BASE. I WAS LATE GETTING BACK ON TIME WAS IN TROUBLE AND WAS RESTRICTED FOR TWO WEEKS TO THE BARRACKS. I HAD MY GUITAR AND ALMOST EVERY NIGHT WE GOT A GROUP TOGETHER AND PLAYED FOR HOURS AND HOURS. I HAD CARRIED IT THROUGH GERMANY WHEN I WAS OVER THERE. SOMEONE WOULD ASK ME TO PLAY FOR THEM AND THEY DIDN’T HAVE TO TWIST MY ARM MUCH FOR I LIKED TO PLAY AND I KNEW A LOT OF SONGS. WHEN I STARTED TO PLAY SOMEONE ELSE WOULD GO GET THEIRS AND SOON WE WOULD HAVE A BAND GOING. I HAD FUN PLAYING.

I WENT BACK AND GOT THE CAR AFTER IT WAS REPAIRED AND DROVE IT BACK TO THE BASE SOME WEEKS LATER AND USED IT AROUND THE BASE AND TO GO HOME ON A WEEK END PASS. THE COMPANY COMPLETED BASIC TRAINING ABOUT MARCH OR APRIL OF 1952 AND GROUPS OF FIFTEEN OR TWENTY MEN AT A TIME WERE SHIPPED OUT TO KOREA. I WAS SHIPPED WITH THE FIRST GROUP. WE WENT HOME ON A TEN DAY LEAVE IN ROUTE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND ON TO KOREA. WE WERE AT SEA FOR FOURTEEN DAYS BEFORE WE DOCKED AT SOUL KOREA.

WE HAD TO ANCHOR OFF SHORE AND UNLOAD INTO SMALLER BOATS TO GET TO LAND BECAUSE THE TIDE WENT UP AND DOWN FIFTEEN FEET AND WOULD LEAVE THE SHIP ON THE BOTTOM AT LOW TIDE IF THE WATER WASN’T DEEP ENOUGH.

BILL HAD JOINED THE AIR FORCE IN 1948 AND WAS IN IT WHEN THE WAR STARTED WITH KOREA. HE WAS STATIONED AT SEOUL WHEN I GOT THERE AND HE MET ME THERE. WE RODE UP TO MY OUTFIT [WHERE I WOULD BE STATIONED] ON A TRUCK TOGETHER. I WAS ASSIGNED TO THE HEADQUARTERS COMPANY OF THE THIRD ARMY DIVISION AS MESS SERGEANT.

Louis Clifford “Cliff” Mancill, Korean War, 1951. A proud Alabama Boy and Patriot!!

THEY GAVE US A COT IN THE OFFICERS TENT AND IT WAS NIGHT WHEN WE GOT TO MY COMPANY AND BILL AND I WERE SITTING ON OUR COTS TALKING ABOUT HOME AND OLD TIMES WHEN ALL HELL BROKE LOOSE. WE BOTH HIT THE GROUND BY OUR COTS AND KNOCKED THE CANDLE OUT. WHAT WE DIDN’T KNOW WAS THAT DOWN THE HILL ABOUT A QUARTER OF A MILE WAS A BATTERY OF 1055 GUNS AND THEY WERE SHOOTING RIGHT UP THROUGH THE PASS OVER OUR HEADS WHERE WE WERE BUT WE THOUGHT THEY WERE INCOMING FIRE FROM THE FRONT LINES. WE GOT THE CANDLE LIT AGAIN AND WENT ON WITH OUR TALKING ABOUT THE GOOD TIMES TOGETHER WHEN WE WERE HOME. WE WERE ABOUT FIVE MILES OF THE 38TH PARALLEL.

THE NEXT DAY BILL WENT BACK TO HIS OUTFIT, AND I WAS ASSIGNED TO MY JOB IN THE KITCHEN. I WAS THE REPLACEMENT FOR THE OTHER MESS SERGEANT. HE SHOWED ME AROUND AND HOW THINGS WERE DONE AND IN ABOUT A WEEK HE WENT HOME. I MOVED INTO HIS LITTLE SIX BY EIGHT TENT AND HAD A COT TO SLEEP ON.

IT WAS COLD THAT WINTER IN KOREA AND I MADE A LITTLE HEATER (FOR MY TENT) OUT OF A FIVE GALLON COOKING OIL CAN. I PUT ROCK IN THE BOTTOM OF IT AND MADE THE VENT PIPE OUT OF TEN CANS PUT TOGETHER. THE BURNER WAS MADE FROM A PIECE OF BRAKE LINE OFF OF A TRUCK, AND SOME RUBBER HOSE WITH A LITTLE VALVE TO CONTROL THE AMOUNT OF FUEL TO THE BURNER. I USED GASOLINE FOR FUEL AND IT WORKED GOOD AND KEPT ME WARM. I NEVER LEFT IT ON WHEN I WAS ASLEEP AT NIGHT. AFTER I LEFT THIS JOB TO COOK FOR ANOTHER UNIT, I LEFT EVERYTHING WITH THE NEW MAN, TENT, STOVE AND A COT AND ABOUT A WEEK LATER, SOMETHING WENT WRONG AND THE STOVE SET FIRE TO THE TENT AND BURNED EVERYTHING UP THE MAN HAD AND ALL THE FOOD THAT IN THE TENT. HE MUST HAVE LEFT IT ON WHILE HE WAS AT THE KITCHEN.

WE MOVED AROUND A LOT AND I DID ABOUT THE SAME THINGS I DID WHEN I WAS AT SOUTH CAROLINA. WE TOOK FOOD UP TO THE FRONT LINES, ONE HOT MEAL A DAY AND THAT WAS AN ORDER OF EVERY DAY. WE LOST TWO COOKS AND THE TRUCK THAT THEY WERE IN FROM MORTAR FIRE WHEN THEY WENT TO TAKE FOOD TO THE MEN ON THE FRONT LINES.

SOMETIMES I WENT WITH THEM AND I GOT INTO TROUBLE WHEN THE COMPANY COMMANDER FOUND OUT ABOUT IT. HE SAID MY JOB WAS AT THE KITCHEN AND NOT TO FORGET IT. I WENT TO THE SUPPLY DEPOT FOR OUR FOOD SUPPLY TWO TIMES A WEEK. WE HAD A GOOD COOK THAT WAS A GOOD BAKER AND HE COULD MAKE GOOD PIES AND CAKES. OUR STOVES USED WHITE GAS AND DID A GOOD JOB COOKING MOST ANYTHING. ALL OF OUR VEGETABLES AND POTATOES CAME IN A CAN, NOTHING FRESH. ALL OF THE MEAT, CHICKEN AND FISH WERE FROZEN BUT IT WAS TOP GRADE FOOD. WE HAD A LOT OF EGGS, FLOUR AND SUGAR AND MOST ALL OF THE SPICES TOO. OUR SUPPLIES WERE ALWAYS MORE THEN ENOUGH BUT IT NEVER WENT TO WASTE, WE GAVE THE MEN SECONDS IF THEY WANTED IT. THE WAR STOPPED AND THEY WERE TRYING TO SIGN A PEACE TREATY BETWEEN COUNTRIES THAT WENT ON AND ON FOR SOME TIME.

I WROTE A LOT OF LETTERS HOME TO MYRTLE AND MOTHER AND DADDY AND THEY WERE GOOD ABOUT WRITING TOO AND THAT HELPED PASS AWAY A LOT OF LONELY TIMES. I MISSED HOME AND THE ONES I LOVED VERY MUCH. I KNOW I LOVED MYRTLE BUT NOT AS MUCH AS I SHOULD HAVE. I FELT SHE WAS MY WIFE AND THE MOTHER OF OUR CHILDREN BUT OUR MARRIAGE WAS NOT WHAT I HAD THOUGHT IT WOULD BE, BUT I WAS DETERMINED TO MAKE IT BE AS MUCH OF A MARRIAGE AS I COULD.

I WORKED AT THE ASSIGNMENT, AS MESS SERGEANT FOR EIGHT MONTHS AND THEY STARTED A SPECIAL ASSIGNMENT GROUP OF ABOUT THIRTY MEN AND FOUR OFFICERS TO RUN SPECIAL RECONNAISSANCE INTO NORTH KOREA. THEY ASSIGNED ME TO DO ALL THE COOKING FOR THEM. I HAD FOUR KOREAN CIVILIAN MEN FOR K.P.TO DO ALL THE CLEANING OF POTS AND PANS. I WAS UP EARLY AND WORKED LATE EVERY DAY WITH SOME TIME OFF BETWEEN MEALS. THEY SPOKE SOME ENGLISH AND I SPOKE A FEW WORDS OF KOREAN AND WE GOT ALONG OK AS TO WHAT HAD TO BE DONE.

THEN I SAW A NOTICE ON THE BULLETIN BOARD THAT SPECIAL SERVICE WAS STARTING A GROUP TO PUT ON SHOWS FOR THE MEN OF ALL COMPANIES IN THE DIVISION. I WENT TO TRY OUT AND MADE THE SHOW. I WAS THEN TRANSFERRED TO SPECIAL SERVICE . THERE WERE ABOUT TEN OR TWELVE MEN IN THE SHOW. WE HAD A LEAD GUITAR MAN, A BASS MAN, AN ACCORDION AND PIANO MAN, A TRUMPET AND A TAP DANCER, AND TWO OTHER MEN THAT SANG VERY GOOD AND I DID COUNTRY SONGS AND PLAYED THE GUITAR AND BASS SOME. THERE WERE OTHERS THAT TOLD JOKES AND DID TRICKS.

My Dad,Louis Clifford Mancill (in middle)in U.S. Army, World War II, about 1944, in France. Identities of other guys only known as “Lem” and “Red”, my Dad’s best buddies.

I ENJOYED MY LAST MONTHS IN SPECIAL SERVICES. EVERYONE HAD TO SERVE A YEAR OVERSEAS BEFORE THEY CAME BACK HOME. I FOUND OUT THAT OUT OF THE GROUP OF MEN THAT I WENT OVER WITH ONLY ONE OTHER MAN AND I WERE THE ONLY ONES TO COME HOME. THE OTHERS WERE KILLED. HIS NAME WAS MAURICE SUBBLE, ONE OF CARLES SUBBLE BROTHERS WHO I WORKED FOR ON HIS FARM. HIS NERVES WERE BAD AND HE DRANK A LOT AND HAD A HARD TIME GETTING OVER WHAT HE WENT THROUGH IN KOREA. I WENT TO SEE HIM A FEW TIMES AND WE TALKED A LOT BUT IT WAS HARD TO FIND HIM NOT DRUNK, SO I STOPPED GOING TO SEE HIM. I WAS AT MOTHERS FOR ABOUT TWO WEEKS,THEN MYRTLE AND THE TWO BOYS WENT BACK TO TEXAS WITH ME. THE RAILROAD GAVE ME MY JOB BACK.

 

LOUIS CLIFFORD MANCILL HISTORY POST #10

I STARTED GOING TO CHURCH WITH MOTHER AND DADDY AND MET MYRTLE ELDER AT THE CHURCH. SHE WAS A GOOD FAITHFUL CHRISTIAN AND WE STARTED DATING AFTER CHURCH AND WOULD GO TO THE SHOWS TOGETHER. SHE WAS TEN YEARS OLDER THAN ME BUT THAT DIDN’T BOTHER ME. ROZELLA WAS ALSO TEN YEARS OLDER. MYRTLE AND HER MOTHER OWNED AND LIVED IN A SMALL THREE ROOM HOUSE ON HOUSTON AVE. IN MOBILE, ALABAMA. IT HAD A LIVING ROOM, BED ROOM AND A SMALL KITCHEN BETWEEN THEM. HER MOTHER WORKED DOWN TOWN IN A DEPARTMENT STORE AND MYRTLE WORKED IN A BEAUTY SHOP ON HOUSTON AVE. EIGHT BLOCKS FROM HER HOUSE.

WE MADE PLANS TO GET MARRIED AND I STARTED TO BUILD A LARGER HOUSE RIGHT IN FRONT OF THE SMALL ONE ON THE SAME LOT. DADDY HELPED ME AND WE SOON HAD IT FRAMED AND CLOSED IN ON THE OUTSIDE.  I LOST MY JOB SO I WORKED ON THE HOUSE MOST OF THE TIME. I HAD IT SEALED ALMOST INSIDE WITH SHEETROCK AND IN 1948 MYRTLE AND I WERE MARRIED AND MOVED INTO THE NEW HOUSE. I WAS 24 YEARS OLD WHEN I GOT MARRIED. I SOON FOUND OUT IT WHAT A MISTAKE IT WAS.

I GUESS I THOUGHT I COULD HELP MYRTLE AND HER MOTHER BY BUILDING THE HOUSE. I WAS WRONG IN BOTH WAYS AND IT DIDN’T TAKE LONG TO FIND THIS OUT. I WAS DIGGING A WHOLE FOR A SEPTIC TANK TO GIVE US A BATH ROOM INSIDE WHEN HER MOTHER TOLD ME I NEEDED TO MOVE OUT OF THE HOUSE THERE WASN’T ROOM FOR BOTH OF US. UP TO THAT TIME WE ALL GOT ALONG GOOD TOGETHER. THAT HIT ME HARD SO I MOVED OUT.

CARLES SUBBLES FATHER OWNED A FARM ACROSS THE ROAD AND 1/4 MILE DOWN FROM ANNIE LEE AND HARLOWS. CARLES HAD TWO BROTHERS AND ONE SISTER. HARLOW’S FATHER DIED AND HE SOLD HIS PART OF THE FARM TO CARLES. THEY GAVE ME A JOB, ROOM AND BOARD AND PAID ME 20 DOLLARS A WEEK. I ROOMED IN THE SAME LITTLE HOUSE AS BEFORE WHEN I WORKED FOR HARLOW. I SLEPT ON SACKS THAT WE PUT POTATOES IN WHEN WE HARVEST THEM. THEY ALSO GAVE ME AN ACRE OF POTATOES AND I GOT ENOUGH MONEY TO PAY THE DOCTOR AND HOSPITAL BILL WHEN CARL LOUIS WAS BORN OUR FIRST CHILD. MYRTLE STILL STAYED WITH HER MOTHER IN MOBILE AND CARL WAS BORN IN THE HOSPITAL IN MOBILE.

I WORKED FOR CARLES THE SUMMER OF 1948 AND ALL OF THE SAME GROUP OF BOYS IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD WERE TOGETHER A LOT. ONE OF THE TRACTORS THAT CARLES AND HIS DAD HAD WAS A FARMALL-H TRACTOR AND IT WOULD RUN ABOUT TWENTY MILES PER HOUR. WE WENT TO THE SWIMMING HOLE ON IT AND GLENN WAS WITH US. I WAS DRIVING AND WE WERE GOING DOWN HILL ON THE DIRT ROAD ON THE WAY HOME, WHEN WE HIT A BUMP IN THE ROAD AND GLENN FELL OFF IN FRONT OF ONE OF THE BIG WHEELS. I PUT ON BRAKES AND LOCKED THE WHEELS BUT WAS SLIDING ON THE ROAD. GLENN WAS SLIDING TOO. THE TRACTOR AND GLENN STOPPED AT THE SAME TIME. WE WERE LUCKY THAT HE WAS ONLY SCRATCHED ON HIS ARM AND LEG. WE WERE ALL LUCKY NOT TO GET HURT MORE THEN WE DID WITH ALL THE THINGS WE DID. WE WOULD TRY ANYTHING.

AFTER THE SUMMER WAS OVER CARLES DIDN’T NEED ME ANY MORE SO I GOT A JOB ON THE KENNEDY FARM IN SUMMERDALE, ALABAMA DRIVING A TRACTOR FOR FIFTY CENTS AN HOUR WITH A HOUSE TO LIVE IN. HIS FARM WAS RIGHT ACROSS THE ROAD FROM OUR OLD FARM. MR. KENNEDY HAD BOUGHT THE OLD PLACE AND THE HOUSE WAS GONE. THE HOUSE HE GAVE ME TO LIVE IN WAS IN TOWN,  JUST ACROSS THE RAILROAD TRACKS FROM HIS PACKING SHED, RIGHT BY THE TRACKS. I THINK I WORKED FOR HIM AT THE PACKING SHED BEFORE I WORKED ON HIS FARM, SACKING POTATOES WHEN THEY CAME OFF OF THE GRADER. WHEN I GOT THE JOB AND THE HOUSE IN SUMMERDALE, ALABAMA, MYRTLE AND CARL CAME AND WE LIVED TOGETHER THERE. THAT WOULD HAVE BEEN 1949.

I REMEMBER THE TRAIN ENGINE BECAUSE EVERY NIGHT THEY WOULD PARK IT RIGHT IN FRONT OF MY HOUSE ABOUT TWO O’CLOCK IN THE MORNING. WHILE IT WAS THERE, THE WATER PUMP ON IT WOULD START UP EVERY FOUR OR FIVE MINUTES AND KEEP ME AWAKE SOMETIME FOR HOURS. I ASKED THEM TO PARK IT DOWN THE TRACK SOME BUT THEY WOULDN’T DO IT AND I GOT USED TO IT AFTER A WHILE.

THE HOUSE THERE WAS TWO STORY WITH A LIVING ROOM, KITCHEN AND A BED ROOM DOWN STAIRS AND ONE BED ROOM UPSTAIRS. THE PROPANE WAS FURNISHED TO COOK AND HEAT THE HOUSE WITH. THERE WAS NO A/C JUST A FAN I PUT IN THE WINDOW.

I BOUGHT A 1947 HARLEY-DAVIDSON MOTORCYCLE AND THAT WAS THE WAY WE GOT AROUND. I WOULD SIT CARL IN A CARDBOARD BOX BETWEEN MY LEGS ON THE GAS TANK AND AWAY WE WOULD GO TO CHURCH AT FAIRHOPE, ALABAMA FOURTEEN MILES AWAY AND TO MOBILE FOR MYRTLE TO SEE HER MOTHER, AND I WENT TO SEE MY MOTHER. I STAYED AWAY FROM HERS.

 

 

GERALD WAS GOING TO COLLEGE AT AUBURN, ALABAMA, AND HE NEEDED TO GET HIS BOOKS AND CAR HOME FOR THE SUMMER. THE CAR HAD A FLAT CRANKSHAFT ON ONE OF THE RODS AND IT KNOCKED BAD. WE WENT THERE ON MY 1947 MOTORCYCLE AND WHILE GERALD LOADED THE CAR WITH HIS THINGS I WORKED ON THE CAR TO FIX THE BEARING BY FILING THE ROD DOWN SO IT WOULD BE TIGHT ON THE SHAFT. THIS WOULD ONLY FIX IT TEMPORARILY TILL WE GOT IT HOME, MAYBE. WE ALSO TIED THE MOTORCYCLE ON THE BACK OF THE CAR. WE SURE HAD A LOAD ON IT. THE FRONT WHEELS WERE ALMOST OFF THE GROUND. SO WE STARTED HOME AND I WAS DRIVING ABOUT FORTY MILES AN HOUR.  WE GOT TO THE OLD SPANISH FORT, [ABOUT THIRTY MILES FROM MOTHERS], AND I TOOK THE MOTORCYCLE OFF TO GO ON TO SUMMERDALE, ALABAMA AND HOME. GERALD STARTED ON TO MOTHERS AND HE SAID,[LATER] THAT THE CAR SOUNDED GOOD AND IT WAS LATE SO HE WAS GOING DOWN THE LONG HILL JUST AFTER HE LEFT ME AND HE LET THE CAR GO FASTER. ALL AT ONCE THE ROD CAME LOOSE AND THE ENGINE STOPPED. HE HAD TO CALL DADDY TO COME TOW HIM HOME. I DIDN’T KNOW ANYTHING ABOUT IT TILL THE NEXT DAY.

 

 

ONE TIME GERALD AND I WERE AT JOHN’S (JOHN ELLIOTT), WHEN HE LIVED ON ALBA BEACH, JUST ON THE NORTH SIDE OF DOG RIVER , DUCK HUNTING. WE WERE ON THE BEACH ABOUT A 1/4 MILE FROM JOHNS. GERALD AND I WERE ABOUT ONE HUNDRED YARDS APART. GERALD WAS STANDING ON A LARGE LOG WITH THE GUN BUTT ON HIS RIGHT FOOT AND THE TOP OF THE BARREL OF THE GUN IN THE PALM OF HIS RIGHT HAND. THE GUN WAS AN OLD SINGLE BARREL WITH THE HAMMER ON THE OUTSIDE OF THE GUN. THE GUN SLIPPED OFF HIS FOOT AND DOWN THE SIDE OF THE LOG AND HUNG THE HAMMER ON THE LOG AND WENT OFF. IT TOOK OFF HIS RIGHT THUMB AND TWENTY FIVE OF THE BEE-BEES IN THE RIGHT SIDE OF HIS HEAD. I HEARD HIM SCREAM AND I CAME RUNNING TO WHERE HE WAS AND SAW WHAT HAD HAPPENED. I SHOULD NOT HAVE LEFT HIM BUT I THOUGHT THE RIGHT THING TO DO WAS GO GET THE CAR AND COME GET HIM. I RAN TO JOHNS AFTER THE CAR AND HAD TO GO AROUND AND COME IN A ROAD TO WHERE HE WAS. WHEN I GOT THERE HE WAS GONE. I KNEW I SHOULD HAVE STAYED WITH HIM AND CARRY HIM OUT. I GOT THE CAR STUCK IN THE SAND TRYING TO FIND HIM SO I LEFT THE CAR AND WENT TO JOHNS AND THE NEIGHBOR HAD TAKEN HIM TO THE HOSPITAL. I BLAMED MYSELF FOR THE WHOLE THING AND WISH I HAD NOT ASKED HIM TO GO HUNTING THAT DAY. THERE IS A LOT OF THINGS IN LIFE WE WISH WE COULD DO OVER OR CHANGE IF NOT FOR OURSELVES BUT TO SAVE OTHERS.

 

 

 

 

LOUIS CLIFFORD MANCILL HISTORY POST #9

I WOULD LISTEN TO THE GRAND-OLD-OPERA ON THE RADIO TO LEARN THE SONGS AND HOW THE MUSIC WENT AND SOON I WAS PLAYING THEM MYSELF. I WORKED THROUGH THE MIDDLE OF THE SUMMER OF 1944 AND QUIT AND WAS CALLED UP TO THE ARMY. I WENT TO CAMP BLANDING, FLORIDA, FOR BASIC TRAINING. WHILE I WAS THERE, MOTHER AND DADDY CAME TO SEE ME AND BROUGHT SOME FRIED CHICKEN. THEY STAYED FOR THE WEEKEND IT WAS HARD TO SEE THEM GO BACK HOME . I WAS SO HOMESICK. AFTER TRAINING FOR SIX WEEKS I WAS SENT HOME FOR A FEW DAYS AND THEN INTO THE WAR IN GERMANY IN EARLY SPRING OF 1945. IT WAS COLD AND I REMEMBER TRYING TO STAY WARM WITH THE WOOL CLOTHING WE HAD. WE WASHED IT WITH GAS IN OUR STEEL HELMETS. YOU COULDN’T USE WATER BECAUSE THEY WOULD FREEZE BEFORE THEY WOULD DRY. I REMEMBER TRYING TO TAKE A BATH IN A SMALL CREEK AND YOUR LEGS WERE BLUE WHEN YOU GOT OUT. FRANCE AND GERMANY WERE SURE BLOWN APART, AND TREES WITH NO LIMBS ON THEM. HOUSES AND BUILDINGS YOU COULD SEE THROUGH WITH NOT MUCH LEFT. I WAS ASSIGNED TO THE 13TH ARMORED DIVISION AND IT WAS UNDER THE COMMAND OF GENERAL PATTON WHO WAS COMMANDER OVER ALL ARMORED DIVISION. I WAS IN AN ARMORED COMPANY AS A  RIFLEMAN WITH SNIPER RIFLE WITH A SCOPE ON IT. WE DID A LOT OF PATROLLING AND THE WAR WITH GERMANY ENDED IN THE SPRING OF 1945 AND I WAS SHIPPED BACK TO THE STATES AND HOME ON A THIRTY DAY LEAVE AND THEN OUT TO CAMP COOK, CALIFORNIA FOR TRAINING FOR THE LANDING ON JAPAN. I FOUND OUT IT WAS SET FOR THE 2 OF NOV. WHICH WAS MY BIRTHDAY. WE WERE WAITING TO BE SHIPPED OUT WHEN THE WAR WITH JAPAN ENDED. I THANK GOD.

WHILE I WAS AT CAMP COOK I MET A GIRL NAMED ROZELLA ZIMPRICH, WHICH WAS ON A BUS WITH ME GOING BACK TO THE BASE. WE TALKED A LOT ABOUT HOME AND OUR FAMILY. SHE WAS A NURSE AT THE HOSPITAL ON THE BASE. SHE WAS A LIEUTENANT IN THE ARMY. WE STARTED DATING AND SPENDING A LOT OF TIME TOGETHER WHEN WE WERE OFF DUTY, MOST OF IT ON THE BASE. ABOUT A MONTH AFTER WE MET I WAS SENT TO FORT HOOD, TEXAS. WE WROTE LETTERS TO EACH OTHER, SHE WAS DISCHARGED AND WENT HOME. SHE LIVED IN SHARON, NORTH DAKOTA WITH HER FATHER AND MOTHER. THEY OWNED A FARM ABOUT FIVE MILES FROM SHARON. SHE WAS THE OLDEST OF SIX CHILDREN, TWO BOYS AND FOUR GIRLS.

English: photo of Darnall Hospital, Fort Hood, TX

First Calvalry Div. U.S. Army, Fort Hood TX

IN 1945, WHILE I WAS AT FORT HOOD, THERE WAS AN OPENING FOR A COOK, SO I WAS SENT TO FORT BAKER,  AT SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA TO COOK AND BAKER SCHOOL FOR TWO MONTHS. THEN I WENT BACK TO FORT HOOD, TEXAS TO JOIN MY OUTFIT AND I COOKED FOR MY COMPANY. WHAT A WAY TO LIVE WHILE IN THE ARMY. NO MORE FOX HOLES TO DIG, NO DIRT TO EAT AND NO MORE 20 MILES TO MARCH AND BEST OF ALL I GOT ALL I COULD EAT.

Pvt. Louis Clifford Mancill in the U.S. Army, World War II.

I WAS THERE ANOTHER EIGHT MONTHS THEN I WAS DISCHARGED. I WENT HOME TO MOBILE ON ARLINGTON STREET FOR A MONTH, THEN I WENT TO NORTH DAKOTA TO SEE THE GIRL AND STAYED WITH HER MOTHER AND FATHER.  WHILE I WAS THERE I WORKED FOR THEM ON THEIR FARM. THEY PUT ME TO WORK HELPING TO HARVEST WHEAT, RICE, CORN AND CUT MILO TO PUT IN THE SILO.TO FEED TO THEIR COWS IN THE WINTER. THEY GAVE ME TWENTY DOLLARS A WEEK AND ROOM AND BOARD. THEY HAD A BARN THAT NEEDED A CEDAR SHINGLE ROOF PUT ON. IT WAS TWO STORIES HIGH AND ONE SIDE HAD 150 ROWS ON IT AND THE OTHER HAD 100 ROWS. THEY WERE EIGHTY FEET LONG. WE PUT THE SHINGLES IN A POND OVER NIGHT AND TOOK THEM UP A LADDER TO THE ROOF AND NAILED THEM ON. DID MOST OF THE WORK MYSELF.

ROZELLA AND I WERE TOGETHER A LOT.  SHE WORKED IN SHARON AT THE HOSPITAL AND ROOMED THERE TILL THE WEEK END. HER FATHER LET ME DRIVE HIS MODEL-A FORD COUPE TO SHARON SOME NIGHTS TO SEE HER. SHE CAME HOME ON WEEK ENDS AND WE WOULD GO TO CHURCH TOGETHER. WE HAD A LOT OF GOOD TIMES TOGETHER AND WENT TO THE SHOWS IN FANGO. I WAS THERE ABOUT THREE MONTHS THROUGH THE WINTER OF 1947 AND THEN WE CAME TO MOBILE TOGETHER ON A TRAIN ABOUT FEBRUARY OF 1948.

DADDY HAD BOUGHT A PLACE ABOUT 1/4 MILE SOUTH OF DOG RIVER AND JUST OFF DOG RIVER ROAD ON THE MOBILE BAY WHILE I WAS IN THE ARMY. IT WAS 300 FEET WIDE ON THE BAY FRONT AND 1000 FEET DEEP. IT HAD A HOUSE 100 FEET FROM THE WATER AND IT NEEDED REPAIR BEFORE MOVING INTO IT. WHILE I WAS IN NORTH DAKOTA. HE HAD WORKED ON IT AND HAD IT FIXED UP NICE WHEN ROZELLA AND I GOT HOME. I GOT A JOB AT THE CHICKASAW SHIPYARD WORKING AS AN ELECTRICIAN. REBUILDING LIBERTY SHIPS THAT WERE USED IN THE WAR.

WE TALKED ABOUT GETTING MARRIED, BUT WE BOTH COULD SEE IT WOULD NOT WORK OUT BECAUSE OF THE CHURCH DIFFERENCE. WE TRIED TO SEE EACH OTHERS SIDE. I WOULD HAVE TO SIGN OVER ANY CHILDREN TO THE CHURCH WITH NO SAY ABOUT HOW THEY WERE TAUGHT OR RAISED.

SHE WAS WITH US FOR TWO MONTHS AND SHE WENT BACK HOME. WE WROTE TO EACH OTHER FOR A MONTH AND SHE WROTE ME  A DEAR JOHN LETTER SAYING SHE WAS GETTING MARRIED. I GUESS I KNEW IT WAS COMING BUT THAT DIDN’T HELP ANY. I WAS HURT, HEART BROKEN AND LONESOME. OUR LOVE WAS STRONG AND DEEP FOR EACH OTHER AND I MISSED HER VERY MUCH. I WAS LOST BUT I KNEW I HAD TO GO ON WITH MY LIFE. I WORKED HARD AT MY JOB IN THE SHIPYARD WITH ALL THE OVER TIME I COULD GET. ONLY TIME COULD SLOW THE FEELING AND HURT.

MY THREE YOUNGER BROTHERS, GERALD, BILL, GLENN AND I WORKED TO FILL IN THE BAD ROAD GOING INTO DADDY’S PLACE ON THE BAY WITH ANYTHING WE COULD HAUL IN. WE GOT BALLAST BLOCKS FROM THE SHIPYARD WERE I WORKED WITH A U-RENT TRUCK, SAND AND DIRT AND OLD CEMENT. WE DID GET IT FILLED UP SO WE WOULD NOT GET STUCK COMING INTO WHERE THE HOUSE AND YARD WERE. I DID ANYTHING TO KEEP ME BUSY AND MY MIND OFF MY TROUBLES. I PLAYED MY GUITAR AND THAT HELPED SOME.

JOHN AND I PUT A BAND TOGETHER AND BOOKED SCHOOLS FOR SHOWS AND MUSIC WE PUT ON. WE WERE ON THE RADIO STATION W.M.O.B. MOBILE FOR ABOUT SIX WEEKS. IT DIDN’T WORK OUT BECAUSE OF THE UNION. WE JOINED IT, BUT DIDN’T HAVE A SPONSOR. WE BROKE UP AND TWO OTHER BOYS AND I WENT TO HOUSTON, TEXAS AND THAT DIDN’T WORK OUT EITHER. WE PLAYED IN BARS AND DANCE HALLS BUT DIDN’T MAKE ENOUGH TO PAY OUR OWN WAY. WE HEADED BACK TO MOBILE AFTER SIX WEEKS, BROKE AND HUNGRY. WE HAD 15 FLATS ON THE WAY. I NEVER FIXED SO MANY FLATS AND PUMPED THEM UP WITH A HAND PUMP,IN MY LIFE. WE BROKE UP WHEN WE GOT BACK TO MOBILE. I FOUND ANOTHER JOB FOR A WHILE, BUT I DON’T REMEMBER WHAT I WAS DOING.

LOUIS CLIFFORD MANCILL HISTORY POST #8

DADDY WAS GOOD AT REPAIRING OR PUTTING IN NEW PUMPS OR DRIVING PIPE IN THE GROUND SOMETIMES AS DEEP AS NINETY FEET TO HIT GOOD SAND WITH GOOD WATER. WE WOULD START THE HOLE WITH A TWO INCH GROUND DRILL TO GET THROUGH THE CLAY TO SOFT SAND. WE WOULD DRILL SOMETIMES THIRTY FEET DEEP BEFORE WE COULD START DRIVING. WE WOULD MAKE A FRAME LIKE A TEE-PEE OUT OF THREE LOGS POLES ABOUT TWELVE FEET HIGH WITH A PULLEY AT THE TOP WITH A ROPE THROUGH THE PULLEY AND DOWN TO A DRIVER WE MADE OUT OF A BLACK GUM LOG TWELVE INCHES AROUND AND THREE  FOOT LONG. WE PUT A ROD IN ONE END SIX FEET LONG TO GO INSIDE THE PIPE WE WERE DRIVING. BY PULLING THE ROPE TO LIFT THE DRIVER UP AND THEN DROPPING IT DOWN ON THE PIPE IT WOULD DRIVE THE PIPE FOR THE PUMP DOWN. THE FIRST FIVE FEET WAS THE POINT WITH SCREEN ON IT. WE WOULD PUT SOAP ON THE SCREEN POINT TO HELP IT GO THROUGH HARD CLAY OR STONE BEFORE HITTING SAND AND WATER. IT WAS TOO BAD WHEN THE PIPE BROKE OFF, THEN WE MOVED AND STARTED OVER. WE SOMETIMES PULLED OLD PUMPS AND REPLACED THE POINTS ON THEM BECAUSE THE SCREEN ON THE OLD ONES WOULD LET SAND THROUGH IT. 

DADDY GOT A JOB IN MOBILE, ALABAMA AND DROVE THE CAR TO AND FROM MOBILE EACH DAY. I DON’T REMEMBER BUT I THINK THE JOB WAS AT A SHIPYARD FIRST, THEN AT THE ANN STREET HOUSING PROJECT DOING CARPENTER WORK, BUILDING HOMES. I DID THE WORK AT THE FARM WHILE HE WORKED IN MOBILE. I KNOW WE WERE STILL AT THE FARM AFTER THE WAR STARTED BECAUSE FLOYD CAME ON LEAVE WITH HIS NAVY UNIFORM ON. A LOT OF THINGS HAPPENS AROUND THAT TIME AND I MAY GET ONE THING AHEAD OF THE OTHER. I WAS NOT EIGHTEEN YET BUT WENT TO WORK WITH DADDY WHILE WE WERE STILL ON THE FARM. I REMEMBER RIDING TO AND FROM MOBILE WITH HIM AND WORKING AS A CARPENTERS HELPER WITH HIM IN THE SAME HOUSING PROJECT WHERE HE WORKED. I WAS DRIVING NAILS IN SUB FLOORING. ANOTHER BOY AND I WOULD DRIVE A 50 POUND KEG OF EIGHT PENNY NAILS A DAY. THE MAN WE WORKED FOR WAS IMPRESSED.

English: Montage of sights in Mobile, Alabama.
English: Montage of sights in Mobile, Alabama. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

IN 1942 DADDY SOLD THE FARM AND WE MOVED TO MOBILE IN A HOUSE WE RENTED ON LEMON STREET, THEN TO ONE ON CAULDRON AND QUAIL AND THEN TO A HOUSE IN THE PROJECT WHERE WE HAD WORKED ON SOME OF THE HOUSES TOGETHER. THEN DADDY BOUGHT A HOUSE ON ARLINGTON STREET. WE WERE SAD WHEN WE LEFT THE FARM BECAUSE IT WAS A LIFE WE WOULD NEVER GO BACK TO AGAIN. IT WAS LIKE,  “GONE WITH THE WIND”.

English: Aerial view of the port and city of M...
English: Aerial view of the port and city of Mobile, Alabama, USA. The view is from the harbor on Mobile Bay to the northwest over the central area of the city. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I DON’T KNOW ABOUT THE JOBS WHILE WE WERE IN MOBILE. DADDY GOT A JOB AT BROOKLEY FIELD AIR FORCE BASE DOING CARPENTER WORK. HE FOUND OUT ABOUT A SCHOOL FOR AIRCRAFT MECHANIC TO WORK ON ENGINES FOR AIRPLANES JUST OUTSIDE BROOKLEY FIELD AIR FORCE BASE IN MOBILE. AFTER I GRADUATED FROM THE SCHOOL I WENT TO WORK IN THE ENGINE SHOP INSIDE THE BASE, REBUILDING ENGINES. THEN OUT ON THE FLIGHT LINES TO WORK ON THE ONES IN AIRPLANES THAT THEY HAD TROUBLE WITH. WHILE I WAS THERE I KNOCKED SMALL BUMP OFF OF MY RIGHT THUMB AND GOT LEAD POISON IN IT FROM THE HIGH TEST GASOLINE. IT CAUSED KNOTS TO COME UP IN A VEIN ALL THE WAY UP MY ARM. THEY DOCTORED AND LANCED THE KNOTS AND PUT SULPHUR SALVE ON IT AND GAVE ME A LOT OF SHOTS TO STOP THE POISON. THEY FINALLY DID STOP IT BUT SAID IF THEY DIDN’T I MIGHT LOSE MY ARM. NOT LONG AFTER THAT THEY LAID ME OFF AND I WENT TO WORK ON THE FARM FOR MY SISTER AND HUSBAND.

WHEN I TURNED 18 YEARS OLD I HAD TO REGISTER FOR THE DRAFT AND SERVICE AND WAS DEFERRED BECAUSE I WAS WORKING ON THE FARM. ANNIE LEE, MY SISTER HAD MARRIED A MAN BY THE NAME OF HARLOW SHERRITTS. THEY LIVED ON A FARM ABOUT A HALF MILE FROM OUR FARM THAT WAS PARTLY OWNED BY HARLOW AND HIS FATHER AND THEY NEEDED SOMEONE TO WORK AND DRIVE A TRACTOR FOR THEM. I WENT TO WORK FOR THEM FOR 20 DOLLARS A WEEK WITH ROOM AND BOARD. I ENJOYED GOING BACK TO THE FARM BECAUSE I WAS BACK AROUND NEIGHBORS AND THE AREA I GREW UP IN AND GOING BACK TO THE OLD SWIMMING HOLE. I LEARNED TO PLAY THE GUITAR WHILE I WAS THERE WITH AN ERNEST TUBB SONG BOOK. 

Sgt Louis Clifford Cliff Mancill

John Travis “John T.” Wilson, Sr

 

 

John Travis “John T.” Wilson,  Sr.

Birth:  Sep. 19, 1866
Escambia County
Alabama, USA
Death:  May, 1916
Blacksher
Baldwin County
Alabama, USA 

Husband of Annie Missouri Flowers. Married December 7, 1887 in High Hill, Walker County, Alabama. 
Father of sixteen children, of which thirteen children lived to adulthood. 
Church of Christ religion. 
John & Annie established a turpentine still and the Wilson Naval Store Company with his brother Robert. John T. traveled and established business accounts, and the public relations aspect of the business, and Robert ran the financial aspect, and they built a very lucrative business.
John T. Wilson owned the first Cadillac in Baldwin County, Alabama, a 1912 Cadillac Touring Car.

 
Annie bought a 1919 Buick in Mobile, Alabama and had it ferried over to the Fairhope landing.

Her son, Bosso, would later be seen “driving through town in his new car”, per the Baldwin County Probate Office. 
In 1926 before she moved to Silverhill, Annie purchased a new “Whippet” car. 
John & Annie instilled a strong sense of education in their children. The Wilson family provided room and board for the schoolteacher for the Blacksher School and actually built the school building on their property.
John & Annie saw to the religious needs of the family. He built a church building for the Church of Christ just northwest of the Blacksher home on the Wilson property. They also provided room and board for the visiting preachers as they passed through the area.

Annie later in 1930, donated the building to the Robertsdale Church of Christ, and the men of the congregation dismantled the building and moved it to Robertsdale, Baldwin County, Alabama.
(source: Carolyn Hastings Dickinson-Aug./Sept.2007 and edited by Debbie Owen) 

Family links:
 Spouse:
  Annie Missouri Flowers Wilson (1872 – 1957)
 
 Children:
  Arnold T Wilson (1891 – 1948)
  Cora Lee Wilson Mancill (1893 – 1971)
  Braxton Wilson (1907 – 1972)
  Infant Wilson (1912 – 1912)
  Infant Twins Wilson (1913 – 1913)
 

 
Burial: Silverhill Cemetery 
Silverhill
Baldwin County
Alabama, USA
 
Created by: TEXAS TUDORS
Record added: Sep 09, 2007 
Find A Grave Memorial# 21448207
John Travis John T. Wilson, Sr
Added by: TEXAS TUDORS
 
John Travis John T. Wilson, Sr
Added by: TEXAS TUDORS
 
John Travis John T. Wilson, Sr
Wilson’s 1912 Cadillac Touring Car 

Added by: TEXAS TUDORS

 

 

 

 

Seal of Baldwin County, Alabama
Seal of Baldwin County, Alabama (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

 

  • Annie Missouri Flowers Wilson (mancillfamilygenealogy.wordpress.com)

    English: Historic marker at Confederate Rest C...
    English: Historic marker at Confederate Rest Cemetery in Point Clear, Baldwin County, Alabama, United States. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Annie Missouri Flowers Wilson

Annie Missouri Flowers Wilson 

Birth: Nov. 14, 1872
Escambia County
Alabama, USA
Death: May 1, 1957
Robertsdale
Baldwin County
Alabama, USA 

Daughter of T. J. Flowers and Mary C. Flowers.
Grand daughter of A. J. Flowers and Cathron Flowers.
Married John Travis Wilson on 7 December 1887 in High Pine, Clay County, Alabama.
Mother of sixteen children, and thirteen lived to adulthood. Faithful lifelong Church of Christ member.
Devoted Wife and Mother.

Family links:
Spouse:
John Travis Wilson (1866 – 1916)

Children:
Arnold T Wilson (1891 – 1948)

Cora Lee Wilson Mancill (1893 – 1971)

Braxton Wilson (1907 – 1972)
Infant Wilson (1912 – 1912)
Infant Twins Wilson (1913 – 1913)

Burial:
Silverhill Cemetery
Silverhill
Baldwin County
Alabama, USA

Created by: TEXAS TUDORS
Record added: Sep 09, 2007
Find A Grave Memorial# 21448176

Annie Missouri Flowers Wilson, 1915, Blacksher, Baldwin County, Alabama

Annie Missouri <i>Flowers</i> Wilson
Added by: Patricia Dunbar
Annie Missouri <i>Flowers</i> Wilson
Added by: TEXAS TUDORS
Annie Missouri <i>Flowers</i> Wilson
Annie Missouri Flowers Wilson

Added by: TEXAS TUDORS


– TEXAS TUDORS
Added: Sep. 3, 2013

– Patsy Bennett Miller

LOUIS CLIFFORD MANCILL HISTORY Post #7

ABOUT THIS SAME TIME IN MY LIFE, I GOT SCARED OUT OF MY SKIN. THE CHURCH IN ROBERTSDALE WAS HAVING MEETINGS AND SINGING EVERY NIGHT AND DADDY WOULD TAKE ALL OF US WITH HIM EVERY NIGHT TO THE MEETING IN THE WAGON. HE HAD A HAY FRAME ON THE WAGON WITH SOME HAY ON IT TO RIDE ON. ON THE WAY HOME ONE NIGHT I WENT TO SLEEP AND WHEN WE GOT HOME EVERY ONE WENT INSIDE THE HOUSE TO GO TO BED. DADDY TRIED TO WAKE ME UP BUT I DIDN’T GET UP I JUST WENT BACK TO SLEEP. EARLY IN THE MORNING I GOT COLD AND GOT UP TO GO IN THE HOUSE. WE HAD A COLLIE DOG THAT STAYED UNDER THE BACK PORCH MOST ALL THE TIME. SO I WENT TO THE FRONT DOOR AND WHEN I STEPPED ON THE FIRST STEP THE DOG CAME AFTER ME THROUGH THE STEPS AND I THINK I JUMPED OUT OF MY SKIN. DADDY CALLED THE DOG BEFORE HE COULD BITE ME AND I WENT TO THE BACK DOOR TO GET IN THE HOUSE BECAUSE I WAS ALMOST THERE ANYWAY.

ONE TIME FLOYD AND GERALD WENT AFTER OUR COWS LATE IN THE EVENING BEFORE DARK, ACROSS THE CREEK THAT RAN THROUGH THIS SAME FORTY ACRES, THEY HAD TO WALK ACROSS A FOOT LOG TO GET TO WHERE THE COWS WERE. WHILE THEY WERE UP THE HILL AFTER COWS, JOHN CAME ALONG AND GOT UP IN A TREE RIGHT BY THE FOOT LOG THAT WAS ONLY WIDE ENOUGH FOR ONE BEHIND THE OTHER TO WALK ON. FLOYD AND GERALD CAME BACK WITH THE COWS AND DROVE THEM ACROSS THE FORD WHERE WAGONS WOULD CROSS THE CREEK. THEY STARTED ACROSS THE LOG AND WHEN THEY GOT TO WHERE JOHN WAS, HE JUMPED OUT OF THE TREE, MAKING SOUNDS LIKE A TIGER. FLOYD HAD A STICK AND GERALD HAD HIS POCKET KNIFE OPENED. THEY HAD SAID TO EACH OTHER BEFORE THEY GOT TO THE CROSSING, WHAT THEY WOULD DO IF SOMETHING GOT AFTER THEM. FLOYD MUST HAVE JUMPED HIGH ENOUGH FOR GERALD TO GO UNDER HIM AND GERALD RAN UP THE HILL. FLOYD WAS STANDING THERE WITH THE STICK, SHAKING IT AT JOHN; JOHN FINALLY GOT FLOYD TO CALM DOWN ENOUGH TO SEE IT WAS HIM. THEY WENT TO SEE WHERE GERALD WAS, HE WAS STILL RUNNING UP THE HILL. THEY CALLED TO HIM AND HE CAME BACK TO THEM. THEY ASKED WHERE THE KNIFE WAS AND GERALD FOUND IT IN HIS POCKET, CLOSED UP. IT SCARED GERALD SO BAD HE DIDN’T GROW ANY FOR TWO OR THREE YEARS.
WE ALL GOT ALONG LIKE BROTHERS AND SISTERS DID. WE DID FIGHT SOMETIMES, LIKE CHILDREN DO. WE WORKED AND PLAYED TOGETHER AND WE WERE HAPPY AND ENJOYED LIFE, GROWING UP IN A TIME WHEN THE WORLD AND ITS WAYS WERE SLOW. EVERYONE KNEW THEIR NEIGHBORS AND HELPED EACH OTHER, AND WHEN A NICKEL WOULD BUY A LARGE CANDY BAR. WE ALL GREW UP STRONG AND HEALTHY, WENT TO SCHOOL, CAME HOME TO WORK IN THE FIELDS OR DO OUR CHORES AROUND THE FARM AND HOUSE. WE ALL HAD OUR WAY OF GETTING INTO TROUBLE. DADDY COULD ALWAYS STRAIGHTEN IT OUT WHEN HE GOT HOME, OR WHERE EVER WE WERE. HE NEVER WAITED TILL WE GOT HOME. HE DID IT WITH KINDNESS OR THE BELT. IF WE GOT INTO TROUBLE AT SCHOOL, WE GOT THE SAME WHEN WE GOT HOME. BUT OVER ALL WE WERE GOOD KIDS MOST OF THE TIME. JOHN AND FLOYD PLAYED FOOTBALL AT ROBERTSDALE HIGH SCHOOL AND GRADUATED, AND WENT TO COLLEGE. HE TAUGHT SCHOOL, AND GOT MARRIED. FLOYD JOINED THE NAVY AND GOT MARRIED. ANNIE LEE GRADUATED AND GOT MARRIED TOO. EMMA LAURA WAS WILD AND I DON’T KNOW IF SHE GRADUATED OR NOT. THE OTHER THREE BOYS GRADUATED TOO.
I WENT THROUGH THE SIX GRADE AND HALF WAY THROUGH THE SEVENTH, AND WAS TAKEN OUT TO DO THE PLOWING AND PLANTING AND THE SAME IN THE EIGHT GRADE. I NEVER WAS ONE TO LEARN FROM A BOOK, IF I COULD SEE IT DONE I COULD DO IT. I FAILED TWO GRADES AND WAS IN THE SAME ROOM WITH GERALD. HE HELPED ME OR I WOULD HAVE NEVER GOT AS FAR AS I DID IN SCHOOL. WE SHARED THE SAME BOOKS AND THAT HELPED OUT WITH THE MONEY. WHEN I WAS THIRTEEN OR FOURTEEN YEARS OLD, THE R.E.A. ELECTRIC CO RAN A POWER LINE ALONG THE HIGHWAY TO SERVICE FARM ALONG THE ROAD. A MAN THAT WORKED FOR THEM SAID IF WE COULD GET OUR HOUSE WIRED THEY WOULD GIVE US POWER I WENT TO ROBERTSDALE, TO A HARDWARE STORE. THE MAN THERE GAVE ME WHAT I NEEDED TO DO THE JOB AND SHOWED ME HOW TO DO IT. I WIRED THE HOUSE UP AND THE MAN LOOKED AT IT AND IT WAS OK SO THEY TURNED ON THE POWER. THIS WAS SUCH A DIFFERENCE FROM KEROSENE AND CARBIDE LAMPS. WE HAD LIGHTS IN EVER ROOM AND ON THE FRONT AND BACK PORCHES. THEN I RAN WIRE OUT TO THE BARN WHERE WE HAD LIGHTS TO MILK THE COWS BY.  WHAT AN IMPROVEMENT WE HAD. 
WE HAD A GOOD OLD MULE NAMED “BECK” SHE WAS A GOOD MULE. DADDY COULD LAY OUT ROWS TO PLANT THINGS IN WITH A GEORGIA STOCK PLOW, WHICH WAS STRAIGHT AS, AN ARROW. HE WOULD LAY THE LINES ON THE PLOW HANDLES AND JUST SAY GEE OR HAW TO HER TO MOVE ONE WAY OR THE OTHER, ROW AFTER ROW. SHE COULD OPEN CORN CRIB DOORS IF IT WASN’T LOCKED RIGHT. SHE WAS BAD ABOUT OPENING THE GATE OF THE BARN YARD AT NIGHT AND LETTING THE COWS OUT. ONE NIGHT SHE OPENED THE GATE AND LET HERSELF AND TWO OTHER MULES OUT. WE LOOKED FOR THEM FOR THREE DAYS BEFORE WE FOUND THEM FOURTEEN MILES FROM HOME. THAT’S WHEN WE KNEW SOMETHING HAD TO BE DONE ONE EVENING I WIRED THE GATE LATCH WITH 110 VOLTS OF ELECTRICITY AND HID AROUND THE CORNER OF THE BARN AND WATCHED HER. IT WASN’T, LONG TILL SHE CAME TO THE GATE AND GOT INTO THE POWER LINE ON THE GATE LATCH. WHEN SHE DID, SHE LET OUT A SQUEAL AND TURNED AROUND SHE DIDN’T STOP TILL SHE GOT TO THE BACK SIDE OF THE PASTURE.  
PS  SHE NEVER DID THAT AGAIN AND I  NEVER TOLD ANY ONE WHAT I DID . I REMEMBER OTHER THINGS THAT HAPPENED AFTER WE MOVED TO THE FARM ON THE HIGHWAY. THE FIRST WINTER WE WERE SICK WITH THE FLU, ALL OF US BUT ANNIE LEE. SHE TOOK CARE OF US AND DID THE COOKING AND HOUSE WORK. THE LADY NEXT DOOR WOULD FIX SOME FOOD AND BRING IT OVER AND PUT IT ON A FENCE POST CLOSE TO THE HOUSE AND ANNIE LEE WOULD BRING IT IN FOR US TO EAT. IT WAS A BAD AND HARD TWO WEEKS FOR US. IT TOOK SOME OF US LONGER TO GET OVER THE FLU. WE HAD NO GOOD DRUGS LIKE WE HAVE TODAY.
ONE TIME WE WERE WORKING ACROSS THE ROAD FROM THE HOUSE PULLING CORN TO HARVEST AND PUT IN THE BARN. GLENN WAS UP ON THE GATE POST WHERE WE WENT TO CROSS THE ROAD. HE WOULD OPEN THE GATE WHEN WE CAME WITH A LOAD IN THE WAGON TO TAKE IT THE BARN. WHILE  HE WAS  WAITING FOR US TO COME HE GOT OFF THE POST TO RUN TO THE HOUSE FOR SOMETHING AND HE DIDN’T LOOK  FOR CARS AND THERE WAS ONE COMING. HE GOT ALMOST TO THE OTHER SIDE AND WHEN HE HEARD THE BRAKES AND TIRES SQUEAL HE TURN AROUND AND WENT BACK TO THE POST. THE MAN IN THE CAR WOULD HAVE MISSED HIM IF HE HAD WENT ON ACROSS THE ROAD BUT WHEN GLENN WENT BACK THE MAN HAD TO GO THE OTHER WAY AND WENT INTO THE DITCH AND TURN THE CAR OVER TWO TIMES BEFORE COMING TO A STOP. NO ONE WAS HURT BUT THE CAR WAS BENT UP SOME. WHEN WE LOOKED FOR GLENN HE WAS UP ON TOP OF THE POST AGAIN ANOTHER STORY WAS ABOUT THE OLD TRUCK WE HAD TO RUN THE CANE MILL WITH. DADDY HAD THE TRANSMISSION FIXED BUT IT WOULDN’T RUN AND IT SAT IN THE YARD A LONG TIME.
ONE DAY WHEN EVERYONE WAS GONE {BUT MY THREE YOUNGER BROTHERS} I WORKED ON IT AND GOT IT RUNNING. I BOUGHT SOME GAS AND WE WENT DOWN THE ROAD ALMOST TO SUMMERDALE AND THE FLOORBOARDS CAUGHT ON FIRE. THE TRUCK DIDN’T HAVE ANY EXHAUST PIPES ON IT WE GOT IT OUT AND WENT BACK TO THE HOUSE. THE TRUCK DIDN’T HAVE ANY BRAKES AND WHEN I TURNED INTO THE DRIVEWAY I WAS GOING TOO FAST AND DIDN’T STRAIGHTEN OUT ENOUGH AND HIT THE CORNER GATE POST. IT WAS A BIG POST AND ALL I DID TO IT WAS BEND IT OVER SOME. THE TRUCK HOOD WAS BENT ALSO. THERE WAS A JUNK YARD ON THE ROAD THAT WENT BACK INTO HE WOODS TO THE SWIMMING HOLE AND I DROVE THE TRUCK TO THE JUNK YARD AND FOUND A HOOD THAT WOULD FIT AND REPLACED IT. WE WENT BACK TO THE HOUSE AND PARKED THE TRUCK IN THE SAME PLACE SO DADDY WOULDN’T KNOW IT HAD BEEN MOVED. I WENT OVER TO THE NEIGHBOR AND BORROWED A POST HOLE DIGGER AND RESET THE POST. WHEN I TOOK THE DIGGER BACK TO THE MAN HE ASKED ME WHAT I USED IT FOR AND I TOLD HIM TO SET A POST. HE SAID HE HAD SEEN ME DRIVING THE TRUCK AND WAS GOING TO TELL DADDY ABOUT IT. WHEN DADDY CAME HOME HE CAME OVER AND THEY TALKED A LONG TIME AND I KNEW WHEN HE LEFT I WAS IN TROUBLE. DADDY NEVER DID SAY ANYTHING TO ME ABOUT IT. I STILL DON’T KNOW IF HE TOLD DADDY OR NOT BUT I WORRIED ABOUT IT FOR A LONG TIME.

 SOMETIME ABOUT THIS SAME TIME, I HAD BOUGHT A BICYCLE THAT WAS A (WESTERN FLYER) AND IT WAS HEAVY DUTY WITH BIG SPOKES IN THE WHEELS AND BALLOON TIRES. I PUT A SEAT ON THE BACK, ONE BETWEEN THE SEAT AND HANDLEBARS ON THE FRAME AND ONE ON THE HANDLEBARS. MY THREE YOUNGER BROTHERS AND I WOULD RIDE TOGETHER AND GO EVERYWHERE. THERE WERE THREE OF US DOING THE PEDDLING AND THE ONE ON THE HANDLEBARS GOT A FREE RIDE. WE HAD THIS BICYCLE FOR A LONG TIME. I DON’T KNOW WHAT EVER HAPPENED TO IT. I MAY HAVE STILL HAD IT WHEN WE MOVED TO MOBILE AND USED IT ON MY PAPER ROUTE WHEN WE LIVED ON ARLINGTON STREET. WHEN WE WERE STILL ON THE FARM I REMEMBER ONE TIME I WAS RIDING IT BACK IN THE WOODS AT A CLAY PIT WHERE THEY DUG CLAY OUT TO BUILD ROADS THAT THERE WERE PILLS OF DIRT AND HILLS WHERE WE WOULD RIDE DOWN AND ONCE WHEN I CAME DOWN THE FRONT TIRE HIT A PINECONE AND THE BIKE WENT ONE WAY AND I WENT THE OTHER AND I BROKE MY LITTLE FINGER ON MY LEFT HAND AND IT HAS ALWAYS BEEN SHORTER THEN THE ONE ON MY RIGHT HAND.

MOTHER WAS A WONDERFUL LADY AND MOTHER TO US AND LIKE DADDY SHE WAS STRONG AND STERN, BUT SHE WAS KIND AND SOFT WHEN SHE PUT HERS ARMS AROUND YOU. SHE LOVED HER CHILDREN AND TOOK GOOD CARE  OF US. SHE WOULD TAKE US TO THE NEIGHBORS FIELDS AND PICK UP POTATOES FOR THREE CENTS A HAMPER TO MAKE MONEY TO HELP FEED AND BUY CLOTHES SO WE COULD GO TO SCHOOL. WE WOULD HELP HER WASH CLOTHES AND IRON THEM. SHE TOOK IN WASHING FROM THE NEIGHBORS AND DO OUR CLOTHES TOO. WE WOULD BUILD A FIRE UNDER A BIG IRON WASH POT AND BOIL THEM IN WATER AND HOME MADE LYE SOAP.  A SALESMAN CAME BY AND LEFT A WASHING MACHINE TO TRY OUT BUT DADDY SAID HE COULD NOT AFFORD IT AND IT MADE TOO MUCH NOISE. IT WAS POWERED BY A GASOLINE ENGINE.

MOTHER (CORA LEE WILSON MANCILL) WAS THE OLDEST OF FIFTEEN LIVING CHILDREN. HER FATHER,  JOHN T. WILSON, DIED WHEN HE WAS FIFTY YEARS OLD, IN MAY 1916, AND I NEVER KNEW HIM. HER MOTHER, ANNIE MISSOURI FLOWERS WILSON, WAS THE ONLY GRANDMOTHER I KNEW AND SHE LOVED AND MADE YOU FEEL SO WONDERFUL WHEN SHE WAS AROUND. LIKE MOTHER, SHE ALWAYS WENT ON ABOUT HOW BIG YOU WERE AND HOW GOOD YOU COULD DO THINGS. I WOULD STAY OVERNIGHT WITH HER ANYTIME MOTHER WOULD LET ME. MY AUNTS AND UNCLES WERE ALL GOOD TO US. I REMEMBER UNCLE B.B. BROUGHT SOME FOOD AND FLOUR TO MOTHER WHEN WE DIDN’T HAVE MUCH TO EAT, AND HOW MOTHER CRIED WHEN HE DID. ALL OF OUR FAMILY WERE LOVING PEOPLE.

Louis Clifford Mancill History Post #6

ON SUNDAY AFTERNOONS WHEN WE GOT HOME FROM CHURCH WE WOULD GO FLYING SQUIRREL HUNTING. WE WOULD FIND AN OLD DEAD STUMP OR TREE WITH WOODPECKER HOLES IN IT AND KNOCK ON IT TO RUN THE SQUIRRELS OUT. THEY WOULD COME OUT AND JUMP OFF OF THE STUMP AND SAIL TO THE BOTTOM OF ANOTHER TREE AND RUN UP THE TREE TO THE TOP. IF WE COULDN’T SHAKE THEM OFF THE TREE WE HAD TO CLIMB THE TREE TO RUN THEM OUT. THEY WOULD SAIL TO THE BOTTOM OF ANOTHER TREE. WE WOULD RUN AND IF WE GOT THERE IN TIME WE WOULD TRY TO WRAP OUR ARMS AROUND THE TREE ABOVE THEM AND KNOCK THEM OFF ON THE GROUND TO CATCH THEM. THEY WOULD BITE YOU IF YOU DIDN’T HOLD THEM JUST RIGHT.

SOMETIMES WE WOULD FIND YOUNG ONES AND TAKE THEM TO SCHOOL IN OUR SHIRT POCKETS, THEY WOULD COME OUT OF THE POCKET AND SIT ON OUR SHOULDER AND EAT NUTS OUT OF OUR HAND. WE WOULD SELL THEM FOR TWENTY FIVE CENTS EACH. WE KEPT THE OLDER ONES IN CAGES AND RAISED LITTLE ONES. THEY BECAME PETS THEY WOULD RUN LOSE IN THE HOUSE. THEY WERE FUN TO WATCH.

squirrel-closeup-02.jpg

WE MADE MOST OF OUR TOYS OURSELVES TO PLAY WITH LIKE BOATS MADE FROM BOARDS WITH NAILS ALL AROUND OUTSIDE AND STRING RUN FROM NAIL TO NAIL AND A STICK IN THE MIDDLE WITH PAPER ON IT FOR A SAIL. ANOTHER WAS WHIRL-A-JIG MADE BY CUTTING OFF A BROOM HANDLE ABOUT SIX INCHES LONG AND MAKING A PEG 1 1/2 INCHES LONG ON ONE END,1/4 INCHES ROUND. THEN GETTING A LARGE THREAD SPOOL AND DRIVING TWO SMALL NAILS ACROSS FROM EACH OTHER. THEN TAKING PRINCE ALBERT TOBACCO CAN AND MAKING A PROPELLER SIX INCHES LONG AND PUTTING TWO HOLES IN IT TO MATCH THE ONES ON THE SPOOL. THEN TAKE A STRING 24 INCHES LONG AND WRAP IT AROUND THE SPOOL AND PULL IT HARD TO SPEND THE PROPELLER OFF THE SPOOL AND UP INTO THE AIR. WE MADE LOTS OF OTHERS THINGS TO PLAY WITH AND HAD FUN DOING IT.

LIKE A LOT OF YOUNG CHILDREN, WE PLAYED A LOT OF GAMES TOGETHER AND MADE MOST OF OUR THINGS TO PLAY WITH. THERE WERE NEIGHBORS WITH CHILDREN AND WE WOULD PLAY BALL TOGETHER. WE PLAYED A GAME LIKE TAG EXCEPT WITH TIN CANS. WE WOULD STACK UP FOUR OR FIVE TIN CANS, THE ONE THAT WAS IT KNOCKED THEM DOWN AND EVERYONE HAD A STICK AND WHEN THE ONE THAT WAS IT FOUND SOMEONE, HE HAD TO BEAT THE ONE HE FOUND TO THE CANS,AND KNOCK THE CANS DOWN BEFORE HE DID. WHEN THE PEANUTS WERE ALMOST READY TO PULL UP AND STILL GREEN, WE WOULD PULL SOME AND BOIL THEM IN A GALLON BUCKET BY THE FIRE AND EAT THEM. WE WOULD COOK CORN ON THE COB AND NEW POTATOES TOO.

I REMEMBER THE BOY MY SAME AGE, JIMMY BARNHEART, THAT LIVED DOWN THE HILL AND ACROSS THE HIGHWAY FROM US. WE PLAYED A LOT TOGETHER. WHEN I WAS ABOUT TEN YEARS OLD WE WERE BACK IN THE WOODS ON A FORTY ACRES TRACK OF LAND THAT DADDY BOUGHT. IT WAS ACROSS THE ROAD FROM OUR TWENTY ACRES, CORNER TO CORNER, IN A HEAVY WOODED PLACE WITH PINE TREES. THE TREES WERE CLOSE TOGETHER ABOUT FORTY FEET TALL AND SMALL AT THE BOTTOM. THEY WERE LIMBER AND WE WERE IN THE TOP OF THEM SWINGING FROM ONE TO ANOTHER, LIKE TARZAN. I WAS IN ONE TREE ABOUT THIRTY FEET HIGH, AND I WAS HOLDING ONTO ANOTHER TREE LIMB. I HEARD A LIMB ON ONE SIDE OF ME CRACK AND I WENT TO THE WRONG TREE LIMB. DOWN I CAME TO THE GROUND AND BROKE BOTH WRISTS I THOUGHT.

DADDY TOOK ME TO OLD DOCTOR HALE IN ROBERTSDALE AND HE SAID THEY WERE ONLY SPRAINED, TO PUT VINEGAR AND CLAY ON THEM AND THEY WOULD BE OK. THEY HURT A LONG TIME. I REMEMBER MY SISTER EMMA LAURA WHO WAS JUST TWO YEARS OLDER THEN I WAS, SHE RAN ME OUT OF THE HOUSE WITH A BROOM. I GOT A HOLD OF THE BROOM HANDLE TO KEEP HER FROM HITTING ME WITH IT AND SHE WAS PULLING IT. MY WRISTS HURT BAD, BUT I WOULDN’T TURN LOOSE OF THE BROOM. ONE DAY ABOUT EIGHT MONTHS LATER I WENT TO DOCTOR JORDAN FOR SOMETHING ELSE AND HE SAID THEY WERE BROKEN. HE WANTED TO BREAK THEM AND SET THEM RIGHT BUT I WOULDN’T LET HIM. THEY DID BOTHER ME SOME THROUGH THE YEARS BUT NOT ENOUGH TO GO THROUGH THE HURT AGAIN.