CHRISTmas In France

christmas_in_france

My Dad’s Mancill ancestors were from France. The Wilson family was from Ireland.

I miss you so much Dad, especially at the holidays. I am so grateful to have had you for my dad and in my life for thirty five years. And…thank you for being so good to my mother! You were not my biological father, but you never treated me like I was not. You made me feel special. We would have nothing without you in our life’s. You were a blessing from God to me, when we needed you most.

Remember Jesus is the reason for the season.

Sgt Louis Clifford “Cliff” Mancill
 
Birth: Nov. 2, 1924
Pensacola
Escambia County
Florida, USA
Death: Dec. 20, 2002
Houston
Harris County
Texas, USA

Grew up in Robertsdale & Mobile, Alabama. Grandson of John Travis Wilson & Annie (Flowers) Wilson; and Edmond & Rosetta (Dillard) Mancill of Alabama. One of eight (8) living children. Son of Elliott Devocious Mancill & Cora Lee (Wilson) Mancill of Alabama.Served as a Pvt. in World War II, in France in the U.S. Army, and was promoted to Sgt. when he served in U.S. Army in Korea.
Served as a infantryman and cook in the Army near the front lines in France. He risked his life to feed our troups.

Married to Myrtle Marie Elder in 1948 in Mobile, Alabama.

Children: Carl and Robert Mancill, in Alabama.

Moved to Houston, Texas in the 1950’s.

Married to Mildred Marie Bartlett in 1955 in Houston, Texas.

Children: Michiael Wayne Mancill, in Houston, Harris County, Texas. Resided in Jacinto City, TX. Divorced in 1968.

Married to my Mother, Jean Marie (Linderman) Frederick on December 5, 1968 at Harmony Wedding Chapel, I45-S in Houston, Texas. Jean survived Louis.

No children by “birth”, but six children by way of “heart”. He always called me his Daughter, and I felt loved by him. I babysat for his son, Michiael, in 1967, on Cheston Dr., Jacinto City, Texas. I was only 12 years of age. Mike and me are brother & sister in God’s eyes anyway. Mike and his Dad loved to play the guitar together. Lou never favored any of the children over the others. He loved all “God’s children” equally.

“Alabama Lou” is what his friends at Shakey’s Pizza Parlor, in Pasadena, Texas called him. Lou played music with Paul Buskirk, Paul’s daughter, and Johnny Day in 1970’s.

Anyone who ever met him knew that he loved his family and was a proud U.S. Army Veteran of World War II and Korea. Louis played the guitar and sang for his buddies.

In 1980, me, my Mother and Dad, were blessed to be able to visit England and France. My Dad revisited some of the places that he was stationed at in France. He never was able to talk about the horror of it all, because he said that it hurt too much.

He was a faithful, lifelong Church of Christ member.

He had a brother, Glenn & Marie (Black) Mancill, who survived him, they live in Friendswood, Texas. Since, Louis and Glenn both resided in Houston, Texas and worked at the Southern Pacific Railroad together; they were able to spend a lot of time fishing and hunting together. They even bought homes two houses down from each other on Cheston Drive in Jacinto City, Texas. “Lou” even had a Harley Davidson motorcycle in 1947.

Louis also had two brothers, John Elliott and Gerald Mancill, who resided in Alabama that survived him.

His parents, brother Floyd, and a sister, Emma Laura (Mancill) Matuk, preceded him in death.

Emma resided in California, and had two adopted children. I never knew their names.

“Cliff” is what they called him at work. He worked for the Lee Thompson, Co. for many years. He did air conditioning and heating repair. But…my Dad could fix anything! He loved working with his hands.

We still have a beautiful home in Houston, Texas, that his two hands helped us to rebuild after it flooded in July 2001, we had 3-1/2 feet of water from Tropical Storm Allison devastate our home.

“Lou” as we called him, and my Mother, Jean Marie Linderman)Frederick Mancill, built us a home up on the lake at Sam Houston Lake Estates near Cleveland, Texas in 1969. Jean’s cousin, Roy Leonard Nelson Jr. helped to build the house, and of course, we children helped a lot too.

In our day, children were not allowed to be lazy, and were taught to help out each other. We did not have to be paid to help out. It still stands today.

He told me that he wired his parents home in Robertsdale, Alabama, so that they could have their first home with electricity back in the 1940’s. He told me that he asked the hardware man how to hook up electricity for his parents, and he told him how to do it and went home and hooked it up. His Mother cried when she saw that he had given her electricity.

I could go on and on about all the things this man did while on this earth, but there isn’t enough time. I’ll just say that he was an Christian, honest, faithful, hardworking, responsible, patriotic, and good man, who is dearly missed.

Family links:
Parents:
Elliott Devocious Mancill (1889 – 1988)
Cora Lee Wilson Mancill (1893 – 1971)

Spouses:
Myrtle Edler Mancill (1917 – 1996)
Mildred Marie Bartley Thomas (1928 – 2000)

Jean Marie Linderman Mancill (1927 – 2012)

 
Burial:
Houston National Cemetery
Houston
Harris County
Texas, USA
 
Created by: TEXAS TUDORS
Record added: Aug 22, 2007
Find A Grave Memorial# 21074276 
 

I JOINED THE ALABAMA NATIONAL GUARD AT FOLEY, ALABAMA IN 1949 WHILE I WORKED FOR CARLES SUBBLE. THERE WERE A GROUP OF BOYS I KNEW THAT WERE IN IT AND WE HAD SOME GOOD TIMES TOGETHER ON FIELD TRIPS. THE ARMY GAVE ME MY RANK OF BUCK SERGEANT BACK AND ADDED THE YEARS BETWEEN MY LAST TIME IN THE ARMY AT FORT HOOD TO MY RETIREMENT IF I STAYED IN FOR TWENTY YEARS.
I WORKED AT THE KENNEDY FARM THROUGH 1949 AND GLENN HAD GONE TO HOUSTON AND GOT A JOB WITH THE SOUTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD AS A CAR CHECKER. HE ASKED HIS BOSS IF THEY WOULD GIVE HIS BROTHER A JOB. HE SAID YES SO IN MARCH 1950 I WENT TO HOUSTON AND GOT THE JOB AS A SWITCHMAN.

I WAS STAYING WITH GLENN AND MARIE IN AN APARTMENT OFF WASHINGTON AVE. GLENN WENT TO MOBILE AND RODE MY MOTORCYCLE BACK AND IT HELPED TO HAVE IT TO GET AROUND ON AND NOT HAVE TO RIDE THE BUS. I WORKED AWHILE AND SENT FOR MYRTLE TO COME TO HOUSTON AND SHE DID AND WE GOT AN APARTMENT ON AVE. H JUST OFF WAYSIDE FOR A MONTH AND THEN I BOUGHT THE HOUSE ON CHESTON DR. THROUGH A VETERANS LOAN. I PAID ONE DOLLAR FOR CLOSING COST TO MOVE IN AND FORTY NINE DOLLARS A MONTH. I WONDERED HOW I COULD MAKE THE NOTES. I WAS MAKING $14.OO A DAY. GLENN AND MARIE MOVED IN WITH US AND WE STILL HAD ROOM ENOUGH FOR ALL.

GLENN AND I WORKED IN THE SAME RAIL YARD AND WE RODE THE MOTORCYCLE TO WORK. ONE DAY WE WERE WORKING AND I GOT OFF BEFORE HE DID AND I WENT TO GET THE MOTORCYCLE AND IT WAS GONE. SOME ONE HAD STOLEN IT. WE NEVER FOUND IT.

IN 1950, THE WAR IN KOREA STARTED AND THE ALABAMA NATIONAL GUARD WAS CALLED UP FOR SERVICE, AND I HAD TO GO BACK TO FOLEY TO JOIN THEM. THE RAILROAD PUT MY JOB ON HOLD TILL I CAME BACK, AND GLENN STAYED IN THE HOUSE AND PAID THE NOTES.

WHILE WE WAITED FOR EVERY ONE TO REPORT WE DID DRILLS AND MARCHED AROUND FOLEY. WE WERE DOING HAND TO HAND COMBAT WITH EACH OTHER AND WHEN I PICKED UP THE MAN I WAS WITH TO THROW HIM. I SPUN AROUND ON MY RIGHT LEG AND MY KNEE JOINT CAME OUT OF SOCKET. THEY TOOK ME TO A DOCTOR AT FOLEY AND HE PUT IT BACK IN AND PUT MY LEG IN A CAST. I WENT TO SOUTH CAROLINA THAT WAY AND IT STILL BOTHERS ME.

I HAVE LARGE PICTURE OF THE TROOPS TRAIN IN FOLEY WHEN WE WERE LEAVING TO GO THE CAMP. DADDY, MOTHER, AND MYRTLE WITH CARL OUTSIDE THE TRAIN AND I WAS HANGING OUT THE WINDOW. IT WAS A SAD DAY FOR ALL OF US FOR ME TO BE LEAVING AGAIN FOR WAR. MY MOTHER TOOK IT THE HARDEST OF ALL.

I WAS THE COOK MESS SERGEANT FOR THE COMPANY AND I DID SOME COOKING BUT MY MAIN JOB WAS TO SEE THAT THINGS WERE DONE RIGHT AND MAKE OUT THE MENU FOR EACH MEAL AND MAKE SURE THE KITCHEN WAS KEPT CLEAN AT ALL TIMES. WHILE I WAS THERE MYRTLE CAME AND WE HAD AN APARTMENT IN TOWN. SHE STAYED ABOUT A MONTH BUT WE RAN OUT OF MONEY, THE THING ALL SERVICE MEN NEVER HAD ENOUGH OF UNLESS YOU LIVED ON THE BASE. I HAD AN OLD CAR AND I TOOK HER BACK HOME TO MOBILE TO HER MOTHER.

IN 1951, ROBERT WAS BORN IN FEB. IN THE BROOKLEY FIELD HOSPITAL AND I GOT A WEEK END PASS AND WENT HOME TO SEE HIM. ON THE WAY BACK THE OLD CAR BROKE DOWN ABOUT SEVENTY MILES FROM THE BASE AND I HAD TO LEAVE IT AT A STATION TO HAVE IT FIXED AND CATCH A BUS ON TO THE BASE. I WAS LATE GETTING BACK ON TIME WAS IN TROUBLE AND WAS RESTRICTED FOR TWO WEEKS TO THE BARRACKS.

I HAD MY GUITAR AND ALMOST EVERY NIGHT WE GOT A GROUP TOGETHER AND PLAYED FOR HOURS AND HOURS. I HAD CARRIED IT THROUGH GERMANY WHEN I WAS OVER THERE. SOMEONE WOULD ASK ME TO PLAY FOR THEM AND THEY DIDN’T HAVE TO TWIST MY ARM MUCH FOR I LIKED TO PLAY AND I KNEW A LOT OF SONGS. WHEN I STARTED TO PLAY SOMEONE ELSE WOULD GO GET THEIRS AND SOON WE WOULD HAVE A BAND GOING. I HAD FUN PLAYING.

I WENT BACK AND GOT THE CAR AFTER IT WAS REPAIRED AND DROVE IT BACK TO THE BASE SOME WEEKS LATER AND USED IT AROUND THE BASE AND TO GO HOME ON A WEEK END PASS. THE COMPANY COMPLETED BASIC TRAINING ABOUT MARCH OR APRIL OF 1952 AND GROUPS OF FIFTEEN OR TWENTY MEN AT A TIME WERE SHIPPED OUT TO KOREA. I WAS SHIPPED WITH THE FIRST GROUP. WE WENT HOME ON A TEN DAY LEAVE IN ROUTE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND ON TO KOREA. WE WERE AT SEA FOR FOURTEEN DAYS BEFORE WE DOCKED AT SOUL KOREA.

WE HAD TO ANCHOR OFF SHORE AND UNLOAD INTO SMALLER BOATS TO GET TO LAND BECAUSE THE TIDE WENT UP AND DOWN FIFTEEN FEET AND WOULD LEAVE THE SHIP ON THE BOTTOM AT LOW TIDE IF THE WATER WASN’T DEEP ENOUGH.

BILL HAD JOINED THE AIR FORCE IN 1948 AND WAS IN IT WHEN THE WAR STARTED WITH KOREA. HE WAS STATIONED AT SEOUL WHEN I GOT THERE AND HE MET ME THERE. WE RODE UP TO MY OUTFIT [WHERE I WOULD BE STATIONED] ON A TRUCK TOGETHER. I WAS ASSIGNED TO THE HEADQUARTERS COMPANY OF THE THIRD ARMY DIVISION AS MESS SERGEANT.

LOUIS CLIFFORD MANCILL HISTORY POST #12

I JOINED THE ALABAMA NATIONAL GUARD AT FOLEY, ALABAMA IN 1949 WHILE I WORKED FOR CARLES SUBBLE. THERE WERE A GROUP OF BOYS I KNEW THAT WERE IN IT AND WE HAD SOME GOOD TIMES TOGETHER ON FIELD TRIPS. THE ARMY GAVE ME MY RANK OF BUCK SERGEANT BACK AND ADDED THE YEARS BETWEEN MY LAST TIME IN THE ARMY AT FORT HOOD TO MY RETIREMENT IF I STAYED IN FOR TWENTY YEARS. 

Alabama Army National Guard Eelement,Joint For...

Pacific Rail Society Special from LA to Reno s...
Pacific Rail Society Special from LA to Reno seen at Floriston, CA Feb 1971 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I WORKED AT THE KENNEDY FARM THROUGH 1949 AND GLENN HAD GONE TO HOUSTON AND GOT A JOB WITH THE SOUTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD AS A CAR CHECKER. HE ASKED HIS BOSS IF THEY WOULD GIVE HIS BROTHER A JOB. HE SAID YES SO IN MARCH 1950 I WENT TO HOUSTON AND GOT THE JOB AS A SWITCHMAN. I WAS STAYING WITH GLENN AND MARIE IN AN APARTMENT OFF WASHINGTON AVE. GLENN WENT TO MOBILE AND RODE MY MOTORCYCLE BACK AND IT HELPED TO HAVE IT TO GET AROUND ON AND NOT HAVE TO RIDE THE BUS. I WORKED AWHILE AND SENT FOR MYRTLE TO COME TO HOUSTON AND  SHE DID AND WE GOT AN APARTMENT ON AVE. H JUST OFF WAYSIDE FOR A MONTH AND THEN I BOUGHT THE HOUSE ON CHESTON DR. THROUGH A VETERANS LOAN. I PAID ONE DOLLAR FOR CLOSING COST TO MOVE IN AND FORTY NINE DOLLARS A MONTH. I WONDERED HOW I COULD MAKE THE NOTES. I WAS MAKING $14.OO A DAY. GLENN AND MARIE MOVED IN WITH US AND WE STILL HAD ROOM ENOUGH FOR ALL.

GLENN AND I WORKED IN THE SAME RAIL YARD AND WE RODE THE MOTORCYCLE TO WORK. ONE DAY WE WERE WORKING AND I GOT OFF BEFORE HE DID AND I WENT TO GET THE MOTORCYCLE AND IT WAS GONE. SOME ONE HAD STOLEN IT. WE NEVER FOUND IT.

IN 1950, THE WAR IN KOREA STARTED AND THE ALABAMA NATIONAL GUARD WAS CALLED UP FOR SERVICE, AND I HAD TO GO BACK TO FOLEY TO JOIN THEM. THE RAILROAD PUT MY JOB ON HOLD TILL I CAME BACK, AND GLENN STAYED IN THE HOUSE AND PAID THE NOTES.

WHILE WE WAITED FOR EVERY ONE TO REPORT WE DID DRILLS AND MARCHED AROUND FOLEY. WE WERE DOING HAND TO HAND COMBAT WITH EACH OTHER AND WHEN I PICKED UP THE MAN I WAS WITH TO THROW HIM. I SPUN AROUND ON MY RIGHT LEG AND MY KNEE JOINT CAME OUT OF SOCKET. THEY TOOK ME TO A DOCTOR AT FOLEY AND HE PUT IT BACK IN AND PUT MY LEG IN A CAST. I WENT TO SOUTH CAROLINA THAT WAY AND IT STILL BOTHERS ME.

I HAVE LARGE PICTURE OF THE TROOPS TRAIN IN FOLEY WHEN WE WERE LEAVING TO GO THE CAMP. DADDY, MOTHER, AND MYRTLE WITH CARL OUTSIDE THE TRAIN AND I WAS HANGING OUT THE WINDOW. IT WAS A SAD DAY FOR ALL OF US FOR ME TO BE LEAVING AGAIN FOR WAR. MY MOTHER TOOK IT THE HARDEST OF ALL.

I JOINED THE ALABAMA NATIONAL GUARD AT FOLEY, ALABAMA IN 1949 WHILE I WORKED FOR CARLES SUBBLE. THERE WERE A GROUP OF BOYS I KNEW THAT WERE IN IT AND WE HAD SOME GOOD TIMES TOGETHER ON FIELD TRIPS. THE ARMY GAVE ME MY RANK OF BUCK SERGEANT BACK AND ADDED THE YEARS BETWEEN MY LAST TIME IN THE ARMY AT FORT HOOD TO MY RETIREMENT IF I STAYED IN FOR TWENTY YEARS. I WORKED AT THE KENNEDY FARM THROUGH 1949 AND GLENN HAD GONE TO HOUSTON AND GOT A JOB WITH THE SOUTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD AS A CAR CHECKER. HE ASKED HIS BOSS IF THEY WOULD GIVE HIS BROTHER A JOB. HE SAID YES SO IN MARCH 1950 I WENT TO HOUSTON AND GOT THE JOB AS A SWITCHMAN. I WAS STAYING WITH GLENN AND MARIE IN AN APARTMENT OFF WASHINGTON AVE. GLENN WENT TO MOBILE AND RODE MY MOTORCYCLE BACK AND IT HELPED TO HAVE IT TO GET AROUND ON AND NOT HAVE TO RIDE THE BUS. I WORKED AWHILE AND SENT FOR MYRTLE TO COME TO HOUSTON AND  SHE DID AND WE GOT AN APARTMENT ON AVE. H JUST OFF WAYSIDE FOR A MONTH AND THEN I BOUGHT THE HOUSE ON CHESTON DR. THROUGH A VETERANS LOAN. I PAID ONE DOLLAR FOR CLOSING COST TO MOVE IN AND FORTY NINE DOLLARS A MONTH. I WONDERED HOW I COULD MAKE THE NOTES. I WAS MAKING $14.OO A DAY. GLENN AND MARIE MOVED IN WITH US AND WE STILL HAD ROOM ENOUGH FOR ALL.   GLENN AND I WORKED IN THE SAME RAIL YARD AND WE RODE THE MOTORCYCLE TO WORK. ONE DAY WE WERE WORKING AND I GOT OFF BEFORE HE DID AND I WENT TO GET THE MOTORCYCLE AND IT WAS GONE. SOME ONE HAD STOLEN IT. WE NEVER FOUND IT. IN 1950, THE WAR IN KOREA STARTED AND THE ALABAMA NATIONAL GUARD WAS CALLED UP FOR SERVICE, AND I HAD TO GO BACK TO FOLEY TO JOIN THEM. THE RAILROAD PUT MY JOB ON HOLD TILL I CAME BACK, AND GLENN STAYED IN THE HOUSE AND PAID THE NOTES. WHILE WE WAITED FOR EVERY ONE TO REPORT WE DID DRILLS AND MARCHED AROUND FOLEY. WE WERE DOING HAND TO HAND COMBAT WITH EACH OTHER AND WHEN I PICKED UP THE MAN I WAS WITH TO THROW HIM. I SPUN AROUND ON MY RIGHT LEG AND MY KNEE JOINT CAME OUT OF SOCKET. THEY TOOK ME TO A DOCTOR AT FOLEY AND HE PUT IT BACK IN AND PUT MY LEG IN A CAST. I WENT TO SOUTH CAROLINA THAT WAY AND IT STILL BOTHERS ME. I HAVE LARGE PICTURE OF THE TROOPS TRAIN IN FOLEY WHEN WE WERE LEAVING TO GO THE CAMP. DADDY, MOTHER, AND MYRTLE WITH CARL OUTSIDE THE TRAIN AND I WAS HANGING OUT THE WINDOW. IT WAS A SAD DAY FOR ALL OF US FOR ME TO BE LEAVING AGAIN FOR WAR. MY MOTHER TOOK IT THE HARDEST OF ALL.   I WAS THE COOK MESS SERGEANT FOR THE COMPANY AND I DID SOME COOKING BUT MY MAIN JOB WAS TO SEE THAT THINGS WERE DONE RIGHT AND MAKE OUT THE MENU FOR EACH MEAL AND MAKE SURE THE KITCHEN WAS KEPT CLEAN AT ALL TIMES. WHILE I WAS THERE MYRTLE CAME AND WE HAD AN APARTMENT IN TOWN. SHE STAYED ABOUT A MONTH BUT WE RAN OUT OF MONEY, THE THING ALL SERVICE MEN NEVER HAD ENOUGH OF UNLESS YOU LIVED ON THE BASE. I HAD AN OLD CAR AND I TOOK HER BACK HOME TO MOBILE TO HER MOTHER. IN 1951, ROBERT WAS BORN IN FEB. IN THE BROOKLEY FIELD HOSPITAL AND I GOT A WEEK END PASS AND WENT HOME TO SEE HIM. ON THE WAY BACK THE OLD CAR BROKE DOWN ABOUT SEVENTY MILES FROM THE BASE AND I HAD TO LEAVE IT AT A STATION TO HAVE IT FIXED AND CATCH A BUS ON TO THE BASE. I WAS LATE GETTING BACK ON TIME WAS IN TROUBLE AND WAS RESTRICTED FOR TWO WEEKS TO THE BARRACKS. I HAD MY GUITAR AND ALMOST EVERY NIGHT WE GOT A GROUP TOGETHER AND PLAYED FOR HOURS AND HOURS. I HAD CARRIED IT THROUGH GERMANY WHEN I WAS OVER THERE. SOMEONE WOULD ASK ME TO PLAY FOR THEM AND THEY DIDN'T HAVE TO TWIST MY ARM MUCH FOR I LIKED TO PLAY AND I KNEW A LOT OF SONGS. WHEN I STARTED TO PLAY SOMEONE ELSE WOULD GO GET THEIRS AND SOON WE WOULD HAVE A BAND GOING. I HAD FUN PLAYING. I WENT BACK AND GOT THE CAR AFTER IT WAS REPAIRED AND DROVE IT BACK TO THE BASE SOME WEEKS LATER AND USED IT AROUND THE BASE AND TO GO HOME ON A WEEK END PASS. THE COMPANY COMPLETED BASIC TRAINING ABOUT MARCH OR APRIL OF 1952 AND GROUPS OF FIFTEEN OR TWENTY MEN AT A TIME WERE SHIPPED OUT TO KOREA. I WAS SHIPPED WITH THE FIRST GROUP. WE WENT HOME ON A TEN DAY LEAVE IN ROUTE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND ON TO KOREA. WE WERE AT SEA FOR FOURTEEN DAYS BEFORE WE DOCKED AT SOUL KOREA. WE HAD TO ANCHOR OFF SHORE AND UNLOAD INTO SMALLER BOATS TO GET TO LAND BECAUSE THE TIDE WENT UP AND DOWN FIFTEEN FEET AND WOULD LEAVE THE SHIP ON THE BOTTOM AT LOW TIDE IF THE WATER WASN'T DEEP ENOUGH. BILL HAD JOINED THE AIR FORCE IN 1948 AND WAS IN IT WHEN THE WAR STARTED WITH KOREA. HE WAS STATIONED AT SEOUL WHEN I GOT THERE AND HE MET ME THERE. WE RODE UP TO MY OUTFIT [WHERE I WOULD BE STATIONED] ON A TRUCK TOGETHER. I WAS ASSIGNED TO THE HEADQUARTERS COMPANY OF THE THIRD ARMY DIVISION AS MESS SERGEANT.

My Dad, Louis C. Mancill moving out with the troops to Korea in 1950. His Father & Mother, Elliott D. Mancill & Cora Lee (Wilson) Mancill, his wife, Myrtle (Elder) Mancill, and son, Carl Mancill, were there to see him off, from Foley, Alabama. He entered the U.S. ARMY as a Private in World War II, and he also fought in the Korean War and was advanced to Buck Sergeant. He was one of the cooks on the front lines feeding our troops. He told me that sometimes he had to move the mess hall three or four times a day with the fighting. He played the guitar by ear and sung for his buddies. He was a proud World War II and Korean War veteran.

I WAS THE COOK MESS SERGEANT FOR THE COMPANY AND I DID SOME COOKING BUT MY MAIN JOB WAS TO SEE THAT THINGS WERE DONE RIGHT AND MAKE OUT THE MENU FOR EACH MEAL AND MAKE SURE THE KITCHEN WAS KEPT CLEAN AT ALL TIMES. WHILE I WAS THERE MYRTLE CAME AND WE HAD AN APARTMENT IN TOWN. SHE STAYED ABOUT A MONTH BUT WE RAN OUT OF MONEY, THE THING ALL SERVICE MEN NEVER HAD ENOUGH OF UNLESS YOU LIVED ON THE BASE. I HAD AN OLD CAR AND I TOOK HER BACK HOME TO MOBILE TO HER MOTHER.

IN 1951, ROBERT WAS BORN IN FEB. IN THE BROOKLEY FIELD HOSPITAL AND I GOT A WEEK END PASS AND WENT HOME TO SEE HIM. ON THE WAY BACK THE OLD CAR BROKE DOWN ABOUT SEVENTY MILES FROM THE BASE AND I HAD TO LEAVE IT AT A STATION TO HAVE IT FIXED AND CATCH A BUS ON TO THE BASE. I WAS LATE GETTING BACK ON TIME WAS IN TROUBLE AND WAS RESTRICTED FOR TWO WEEKS TO THE BARRACKS. I HAD MY GUITAR AND ALMOST EVERY NIGHT WE GOT A GROUP TOGETHER AND PLAYED FOR HOURS AND HOURS. I HAD CARRIED IT THROUGH GERMANY WHEN I WAS OVER THERE. SOMEONE WOULD ASK ME TO PLAY FOR THEM AND THEY DIDN’T HAVE TO TWIST MY ARM MUCH FOR I LIKED TO PLAY AND I KNEW A LOT OF SONGS. WHEN I STARTED TO PLAY SOMEONE ELSE WOULD GO GET THEIRS AND SOON WE WOULD HAVE A BAND GOING. I HAD FUN PLAYING.

I WENT BACK AND GOT THE CAR AFTER IT WAS REPAIRED AND DROVE IT BACK TO THE BASE SOME WEEKS LATER AND USED IT AROUND THE BASE AND TO GO HOME ON A WEEK END PASS. THE COMPANY COMPLETED BASIC TRAINING ABOUT MARCH OR APRIL OF 1952 AND GROUPS OF FIFTEEN OR TWENTY MEN AT A TIME WERE SHIPPED OUT TO KOREA. I WAS SHIPPED WITH THE FIRST GROUP. WE WENT HOME ON A TEN DAY LEAVE IN ROUTE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND ON TO KOREA. WE WERE AT SEA FOR FOURTEEN DAYS BEFORE WE DOCKED AT SOUL KOREA.

WE HAD TO ANCHOR OFF SHORE AND UNLOAD INTO SMALLER BOATS TO GET TO LAND BECAUSE THE TIDE WENT UP AND DOWN FIFTEEN FEET AND WOULD LEAVE THE SHIP ON THE BOTTOM AT LOW TIDE IF THE WATER WASN’T DEEP ENOUGH.

BILL HAD JOINED THE AIR FORCE IN 1948 AND WAS IN IT WHEN THE WAR STARTED WITH KOREA. HE WAS STATIONED AT SEOUL WHEN I GOT THERE AND HE MET ME THERE. WE RODE UP TO MY OUTFIT [WHERE I WOULD BE STATIONED] ON A TRUCK TOGETHER. I WAS ASSIGNED TO THE HEADQUARTERS COMPANY OF THE THIRD ARMY DIVISION AS MESS SERGEANT.

Louis Clifford “Cliff” Mancill, Korean War, 1951. A proud Alabama Boy and Patriot!!

THEY GAVE US A COT IN THE OFFICERS TENT AND IT WAS NIGHT WHEN WE GOT TO MY COMPANY AND BILL AND I WERE SITTING ON OUR COTS TALKING ABOUT HOME AND OLD TIMES WHEN ALL HELL BROKE LOOSE. WE BOTH HIT THE GROUND BY OUR COTS AND KNOCKED THE CANDLE OUT. WHAT WE DIDN’T KNOW WAS THAT DOWN THE HILL ABOUT A QUARTER OF A MILE WAS A BATTERY OF 1055 GUNS AND THEY WERE SHOOTING RIGHT UP THROUGH THE PASS OVER OUR HEADS WHERE WE WERE BUT WE THOUGHT THEY WERE INCOMING FIRE FROM THE FRONT LINES. WE GOT THE CANDLE LIT AGAIN AND WENT ON WITH OUR TALKING ABOUT THE GOOD TIMES TOGETHER WHEN WE WERE HOME. WE WERE ABOUT FIVE MILES OF THE 38TH PARALLEL.

THE NEXT DAY BILL WENT BACK TO HIS OUTFIT, AND I WAS ASSIGNED TO MY JOB IN THE KITCHEN. I WAS THE REPLACEMENT FOR THE OTHER MESS SERGEANT. HE SHOWED ME AROUND AND HOW THINGS WERE DONE AND IN ABOUT A WEEK HE WENT HOME. I MOVED INTO HIS LITTLE SIX BY EIGHT TENT AND HAD A COT TO SLEEP ON.

IT WAS COLD THAT WINTER IN KOREA AND I MADE A LITTLE HEATER (FOR MY TENT) OUT OF A FIVE GALLON COOKING OIL CAN. I PUT ROCK IN THE BOTTOM OF IT AND MADE THE VENT PIPE OUT OF TEN CANS PUT TOGETHER. THE BURNER WAS MADE FROM A PIECE OF BRAKE LINE OFF OF A TRUCK, AND SOME RUBBER HOSE WITH A LITTLE VALVE TO CONTROL THE AMOUNT OF FUEL TO THE BURNER. I USED GASOLINE FOR FUEL AND IT WORKED GOOD AND KEPT ME WARM. I NEVER LEFT IT ON WHEN I WAS ASLEEP AT NIGHT. AFTER I LEFT THIS JOB TO COOK FOR ANOTHER UNIT, I LEFT EVERYTHING WITH THE NEW MAN, TENT, STOVE AND A COT AND ABOUT A WEEK LATER, SOMETHING WENT WRONG AND THE STOVE SET FIRE TO THE TENT AND BURNED EVERYTHING UP THE MAN HAD AND ALL THE FOOD THAT IN THE TENT. HE MUST HAVE LEFT IT ON WHILE HE WAS AT THE KITCHEN.

WE MOVED AROUND A LOT AND I DID ABOUT THE SAME THINGS I DID WHEN I WAS AT SOUTH CAROLINA. WE TOOK FOOD UP TO THE FRONT LINES, ONE HOT MEAL A DAY AND THAT WAS AN ORDER OF EVERY DAY. WE LOST TWO COOKS AND THE TRUCK THAT THEY WERE IN FROM MORTAR FIRE WHEN THEY WENT TO TAKE FOOD TO THE MEN ON THE FRONT LINES.

SOMETIMES I WENT WITH THEM AND I GOT INTO TROUBLE WHEN THE COMPANY COMMANDER FOUND OUT ABOUT IT. HE SAID MY JOB WAS AT THE KITCHEN AND NOT TO FORGET IT. I WENT TO THE SUPPLY DEPOT FOR OUR FOOD SUPPLY TWO TIMES A WEEK. WE HAD A GOOD COOK THAT WAS A GOOD BAKER AND HE COULD MAKE GOOD PIES AND CAKES. OUR STOVES USED WHITE GAS AND DID A GOOD JOB COOKING MOST ANYTHING. ALL OF OUR VEGETABLES AND POTATOES CAME IN A CAN, NOTHING FRESH. ALL OF THE MEAT, CHICKEN AND FISH WERE FROZEN BUT IT WAS TOP GRADE FOOD. WE HAD A LOT OF EGGS, FLOUR AND SUGAR AND MOST ALL OF THE SPICES TOO. OUR SUPPLIES WERE ALWAYS MORE THEN ENOUGH BUT IT NEVER WENT TO WASTE, WE GAVE THE MEN SECONDS IF THEY WANTED IT. THE WAR STOPPED AND THEY WERE TRYING TO SIGN A PEACE TREATY BETWEEN COUNTRIES THAT WENT ON AND ON FOR SOME TIME.

I WROTE A LOT OF LETTERS HOME TO MYRTLE AND MOTHER AND DADDY AND THEY WERE GOOD ABOUT WRITING TOO AND THAT HELPED PASS AWAY A LOT OF LONELY TIMES. I MISSED HOME AND THE ONES I LOVED VERY MUCH. I KNOW I LOVED MYRTLE BUT NOT AS MUCH AS I SHOULD HAVE. I FELT SHE WAS MY WIFE AND THE MOTHER OF OUR CHILDREN BUT OUR MARRIAGE WAS NOT WHAT I HAD THOUGHT IT WOULD BE, BUT I WAS DETERMINED TO MAKE IT BE AS MUCH OF A MARRIAGE AS I COULD.

I WORKED AT THE ASSIGNMENT, AS MESS SERGEANT FOR EIGHT MONTHS AND THEY STARTED A SPECIAL ASSIGNMENT GROUP OF ABOUT THIRTY MEN AND FOUR OFFICERS TO RUN SPECIAL RECONNAISSANCE INTO NORTH KOREA. THEY ASSIGNED ME TO DO ALL THE COOKING FOR THEM. I HAD FOUR KOREAN CIVILIAN MEN FOR K.P.TO DO ALL THE CLEANING OF POTS AND PANS. I WAS UP EARLY AND WORKED LATE EVERY DAY WITH SOME TIME OFF BETWEEN MEALS. THEY SPOKE SOME ENGLISH AND I SPOKE A FEW WORDS OF KOREAN AND WE GOT ALONG OK AS TO WHAT HAD TO BE DONE.

THEN I SAW A NOTICE ON THE BULLETIN BOARD THAT SPECIAL SERVICE WAS STARTING A GROUP TO PUT ON SHOWS FOR THE MEN OF ALL COMPANIES IN THE DIVISION. I WENT TO TRY OUT AND MADE THE SHOW. I WAS THEN TRANSFERRED TO SPECIAL SERVICE . THERE WERE ABOUT TEN OR TWELVE MEN IN THE SHOW. WE HAD A LEAD GUITAR MAN, A BASS MAN, AN ACCORDION AND PIANO MAN, A TRUMPET AND A TAP DANCER, AND TWO OTHER MEN THAT SANG VERY GOOD AND I DID COUNTRY SONGS AND PLAYED THE GUITAR AND BASS SOME. THERE WERE OTHERS THAT TOLD JOKES AND DID TRICKS.

My Dad,Louis Clifford Mancill (in middle)in U.S. Army, World War II, about 1944, in France. Identities of other guys only known as “Lem” and “Red”, my Dad’s best buddies.

I ENJOYED MY LAST MONTHS IN SPECIAL SERVICES. EVERYONE HAD TO SERVE A YEAR OVERSEAS BEFORE THEY CAME BACK HOME. I FOUND OUT THAT OUT OF THE GROUP OF MEN THAT I WENT OVER WITH ONLY ONE OTHER MAN AND I WERE THE ONLY ONES TO COME HOME. THE OTHERS WERE KILLED. HIS NAME WAS MAURICE SUBBLE, ONE OF CARLES SUBBLE BROTHERS WHO I WORKED FOR ON HIS FARM. HIS NERVES WERE BAD AND HE DRANK A LOT AND HAD A HARD TIME GETTING OVER WHAT HE WENT THROUGH IN KOREA. I WENT TO SEE HIM A FEW TIMES AND WE TALKED A LOT BUT IT WAS HARD TO FIND HIM NOT DRUNK, SO I STOPPED GOING TO SEE HIM. I WAS AT MOTHERS FOR ABOUT TWO WEEKS,THEN MYRTLE AND THE TWO BOYS WENT BACK TO TEXAS WITH ME. THE RAILROAD GAVE ME MY JOB BACK.

 

Rosetta Elvira “Rosa” Dillard~~Wife of Edmond Mancill~~Alabama

Rosetta Elvira “Rosa” Dillard Mancill

 

Eufaula, AlabamaEufaula, Barbour County, AlabamaUSA

Birth:  1849
Eufaula
Barbour County
Alabama, USA
Death:  1927
Rose Hill (Covington County)
Covington County
Alabama, USA
Parents: William L. Dillard and Elizabeth Jane “Becky” Dillard
 
Family links: 
 Spouse:
  Edmond Mancill (1854 – 1941)
 
 Children:
  Florence M Deer (1874 – 1960)
  Annie Mancill Parker (1876 – 1968)
  Minnie L Shaver (1878 – 1972)
  Herbert Mancill (1880 – 1884)
  Donie Mancill (1882 – 1883)
  Honie Ernest Mancill (1884 – 1959)
  Elliott Devocious Mancill (1889 – 1988)
  Alchus Gillis Mancill (1893 – 1973)
  John Elliott Mancill (1917 – 2010)
 

 
Burial:
Old Town Cemetery 
Conecuh County
Alabama, USA
 

 
Created by: Patricia Dunbar
Record added: Jan 19, 2010 
Find A Grave Memorial# 46861440

Edmond Mancill

Husband of Rosa, Edmond “Ed” Mancill

Rosetta Elvira Rosa <i>Dillard</i> Mancill
Added by: TEXAS TUDORS
 
Rosetta Elvira Rosa <i>Dillard</i> Mancill
Added by: Patsy Bennett Miller
 
Rosetta Elvira Rosa <i>Dillard</i> Mancill
Added by: Tina Burkett